Detection and correction of faulty photo controls in outdoor luminaires

The authors of the patent

H05B37/02 - Controlling
H05B37/03 - Detecting lamp failure

The owners of the patent US9445485:

Express Imaging Systems LLC

 

Systems, methods and articles for providing centralized control of area lighting hours of illumination. An area illumination system includes a central control system operatively coupled to a plurality of luminaires through a data communications network. In some implementations, the data communications network may include a power-line power distribution system and/or a wired or wireless communications network. Each of the plurality of luminaires includes a local illumination control system, which may include a photosensor. The central control system identifies one or more luminaires as having a faulty local illumination control system and issues illumination commands to such luminaires through the data communications network so that the luminaires continue to operate normally without a working local illumination control system. The central control system may store data relating to luminaires having faulty illumination control systems, such as addresses, map data, routing data, or the like.

 

 

BACKGROUND
1. Technical Field
The present disclosure relates to illumination, and more particularly to control of a plurality of illumination devices and systems.
2. Description of the Related Art
Luminaires enjoy widespread use in a variety of industrial, commercial, and municipal applications. Such applications can include general or area lighting of workspaces, roadways, parking lots, and the like. Multiple luminaires are typically arranged in patterns and positioned at intervals sufficient to provide a minimum overall level of illumination across the area of interest. For example, luminaires may be spaced at intervals along a driveway in a multilevel parking garage to provide an overall level of illumination that permits safe ingress and egress by pedestrians as well as permits safe operation of motor vehicles within the parking garage. In a similar manner, luminaires may be spaced at intervals throughout a commercial center parking lot to promote safe operation of motor vehicles, permit safe ingress and egress by customers, and foster a sense of safety and well-being for business patrons within the commercial center. Similarly, a number of luminaires may be spaced along a roadway to provide a level of area illumination permitting safe operation of motor vehicles on the roadway and, where applicable, safe passage of pedestrians on sidewalks adjoining the roadway.
To simplify power distribution and control wiring, such luminaires may be organized into groups or similar hierarchical power and control structures. For example, multiple luminaires along a roadway may be grouped together on a common power circuit that is controlled using a single, centralized controller to collectively adjust the luminous output of all of the luminaires in the group. In another instance, multiple luminaires within a parking garage may be controlled using a single photocell mounted on the exterior of the parking garage. Such installations may however compromise operational flexibility for ease of installation and simplicity of operation.
Energy conservation has become of ever-increasing importance. Efficient use of energy can result in a variety of benefits, including financial benefits such as cost savings and environmental benefits such as preservation of natural resources and reduction in “green house” (e.g., CO2) gas emissions.
Residential, commercial, and street lighting which illuminate interior and exterior spaces consume a significant amount of energy. Conventional lighting devices or luminaires exist in a broad range of designs, suitable for various uses. Lighting devices employ a variety of conventional light sources, for example incandescent lamps, fluorescent lamps such as high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps (e.g., mercury vapor lamps, high-pressure sodium lamps, metal halide lamps).
There appear to be at least two primary approaches to reducing energy consumption associated with area lighting systems. One approach employs higher efficiency light sources. The other approach selectively provides light only when needed.
Use of higher efficiency light sources may, for instance, include replacing incandescent lamps with fluorescent lamps or even with solid-state light sources (e.g., light emitting diodes (LEDs), organic LEDs (OLEDs), polymer LEDs (PLEDs)) to increase energy efficiency. In some instances, these higher efficiency light sources may present a number of problems. For example, fluorescent light sources may take a relatively long time after being turned ON to achieve their full rated level of output light or illumination. Such light sources also typically have a high energy consumption during warm-up. Many higher efficiency light sources emit light with a low color rendering index (CRI). For reference, sunlight has a CRI of 100 and represents “ideal light” which contains a continuous spectrum of visible radiation. Low CRI light is less pleasing to the human eye. Surfaces illuminated with low CRI light may not be perceived in their “true” color. Low CRI light makes it more difficult to discern details, often requiring a higher level of output light or illumination to discern details that would otherwise be discernable in high CRI light. Further, higher efficiency light sources may require additional circuitry (e.g., ballasts) and/or thermal management techniques (e.g., passive or active cooling).
Providing area illumination only when needed can be achieved manually by a user of the lighting system, or automatically through the use of one or more control mechanisms. Automatic control mechanisms generally fall into two broad categories, timers and environmental sensors. Timer-based control mechanisms turn light sources ON and OFF based on time. The times are typically user configurable and result in the luminaire turning ON for a period of time and then OFF for the remainder of a 24 hour period. Such timing circuits rely on the user to account for changes in length of daylight which may occur throughout a year by adjusting the ON period of the luminaire commensurate with the change in day length. Very often, timer-based control mechanisms are set once and never updated.
Automatic control devices such as photosensitive transducers (photosensors) and motion or proximity sensors add to the cost of a light fixture, and are frequently mounted in exposed positions where environmental or physical damage is unavoidable or vandalism may occur. In addition, a failure of the automatic control mechanism, for example failure of a photosensor used to turn the light source ON or OFF dependent upon the measured ambient light level, may result in the light source remaining in a continuously ON state in the event the automatic control mechanism fails in a “closed” position, permitting current flow to the light source, or in a continuously OFF state in the event the automatic control mechanism fails in an “open” position, interrupting current flow to the light source. Either failure mode results in an undesirable mode of operation of the light source.
Generally, a photocontrol is a device that switches or controls electrical loads based on ambient light levels. As an example, a photocontrol can be used as a switch that provides electrical power to a luminaire only when detected light levels are below a desired level. Photocontrols used for such luminaires may include photosensors that are electrically and operably coupled to switching devices rated for use at relatively high line voltages (e.g., 90 VAC to 600 VAC) and at relatively high currents (e.g., amperes and higher). For example, a photocontrol for a luminaire may include a photosensor that controls an electro-mechanical relay coupled between a source of electrical power and a control device (e.g., a magnetic or electronic transformer) within the luminaire. The electro-mechanical relay may be configured to be in an electrically continuous state unless a signal from the photosensor is present to supply power to the luminaire. If the photosensor is illuminated with a sufficient amount of light, the photosensor outputs the signal that causes the electro-mechanical relay to switch to an electrically discontinuous state such that no power is supplied to the luminaire.
A typical electro-mechanical relay used with a photocontrol for a luminaire has a relatively short life span. For example, electro-mechanical relays of conventional photocontrols used with luminaires may be rated to have only 5000 contactor closures with standard loads. Arcing caused by high capacitive in-rush currents of electronically ballasted luminaires and inductive “kick back” of magnetically ballasted luminaires can corrode the contactors of the electro-mechanical relays. Additionally, the contactors may include silver or other metal alloys upon which oxides and sulfides may form during normal operation. At line voltage and current, such oxides and sulfides may present a negligible resistance to the passage of current through the contactors. However, at relatively low voltages (e.g., 2V to 24V) and relatively low currents (e.g., microamps) such as those used for digital logic level signaling, the impedance presented by contaminants including oxide and sulfide accumulations can hinder or even prevent the transmission of current through the contactors. Thus, conventional photocontrols for luminaires can have especially short life spans when used in applications where the switching of relatively low voltage and relatively low current signals is required, for example, with luminaires that include solid-state light source drivers, for example, light emitting diode (LED) drivers that receive control signals for LED arrays.
Due to the relatively short life span, photocontrols are a weak link in the reliability chain for illumination systems. Often, service trips to replace a faulty photocontrol may cost significantly more than the photocontrol itself. Previous attempts at circumventing the service of luminaires because of faulty photocontrols have included attempts to design more robust (and more expensive) photocontrols, adding auxiliary ambient light sensors to luminaires that take over control in the event of primary photocontrol failure, and monitoring photocontrols and using a time source such as a real-time clock to control the operation of a luminaire in the event of a photocontrol failure.
BRIEF SUMMARY
A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires, each of the area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may be summarized as including: receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system; receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day; generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications network.
The method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located luminaires, each of the luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may further include: receiving, at the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system, the illumination command through the data communications network; and controlling, at the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system, illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command.
Controlling the illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command may include controlling at least one light source to be in an illuminating state. Receiving illumination data may include receiving photosensor data obtained from a photosensor operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor. Receiving illumination data may include receiving time data from a clock operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor. Receiving illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system may include receiving photosensor data from at least one of the plurality of luminaires via the data communications network. Receiving illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system may include verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values. Verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values may include verifying whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date. Receiving illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day may include: receiving illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule from an external device; and storing the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium. Distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a data communications network may include distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a wireless communications network. Distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a data communications network may include distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a power-line power distribution system. Distributing the illumination command through a power-line power distribution system may include superimposing the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system. Receiving illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day may include receiving illumination data from an illumination data source positioned remote from at least some of the plurality of luminaires.
The method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located luminaires, each of the luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may further include storing a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
The method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located luminaires, each of the luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may further include: generating, by the at least one central control processor, a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and storing the route map in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
The of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located luminaires, each of the luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may further include: receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system data that identifies at least one of the one or more luminaires previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and causing the at least one of the one or more luminaires identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources of the at least one of the one or more luminaires using the respective operational illumination control systems.
An illumination system may be summarized as including: at least one central control system including: at least one central control processor; at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor; a central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to: identify at least one luminaire coupled to the power-line distribution system as having a faulty illumination control system; receive illumination data from the at least one illumination data source relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day; generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and distribute the illumination command through the data communications network via the central transceiver to the at least one luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system.
The illumination system may further include: a plurality of area lighting luminaires, each of the area lighting luminaires including: at least one luminaire control processor; an illumination control system; at least one light source operatively coupled to the luminaire control processor; a luminaire transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one luminaire control processor and the data communications network; and at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one luminaire control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one luminaire control processor, cause the at least one luminaire control processor to: receive the illumination command through the data communications network via the luminaire transceiver; and control the operation of the at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command when the illumination control system is identified as being faulty.
The data communications network may include a power-line power distribution system, and the luminaire transceiver of each luminaire may receive distributed power from the power-line power distribution system and may separate the illumination command from the distributed power. The at least one central control processor may receive illumination control system fault data from at least one of the plurality of luminaires via the data communications network. The at least one central control processor may verify whether an illumination control signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values. The at least one central control processor may verify whether an illumination control signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date. The at least one central control processor may receive illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule from an external device; and may store the illumination data in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium. The illumination data source may include a photosensor operatively coupled to the central control processor, and the at least one central control processor may receive photosensor data from the photosensor. The illumination data source may include a clock operatively coupled to the central control processor, and the at least one central control processor may receive time data from the clock. The data communications network may include a power-line power distribution system. The at least one central transceiver may superimpose the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system. The illumination data source may be positioned remote from at least some of the plurality of luminaires. The at least one central control processor may receive illumination control system data that identifies at least one of the one or more luminaires previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and may cause the at least one of the one or more luminaires identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources of the at least one of the one or more luminaires using the respective operational illumination control systems.
A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires, each of the plurality of area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system may be summarized as including: receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective area lighting luminaires as a faulty illumination control system; receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day; generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and causing the illumination command to be distributed through a data communications network; wherein each of the plurality of area lighting luminaires receives the illumination command through the data communications network, and each of the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system execute the received illumination command.
Causing the illumination command to be distributed through a data communications network may include causing the illumination command to be distributed through at least one of a wireless communications network or a power-line power distribution system.
An illumination system to control the operation of a plurality of area lighting luminaires may be summarized as including: at least one central control system including: at least one central control processor; at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor; a central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to: receive illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system; receive illumination data from the at least one illumination data source relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day; generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and cause the illumination command to be distributed through the data communications network via the central transceiver to the plurality of luminaires, each of the plurality of luminaires receives the illumination command through the data communications network, and each of the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system execute the received illumination command.
A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires of an area lighting system, each of the area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system, may be summarized as including: receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data from one of the luminaires of the area lighting system, the illumination control system fault data signifies the illumination control system of the one of the luminaires is a faulty illumination control system; identifying, by the at least one central control processor, at least one proximate luminaire of the plurality of luminaires of the area lighting system as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system; from time-to-time, receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data from a respective illumination control system of the at least one identified proximate luminaire, the illumination data including at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data; generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and distributing the illumination command to the luminaire of the area lighting system identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel.
Identifying at least one proximate luminaire may include identifying a first proximate luminaire and a second proximate luminaire as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, and receiving illumination data comprises receiving illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the first proximate luminaire and the second proximate luminaire. Identifying at least one proximate luminaire may include comparing a physical address associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective physical addresses associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. Identifying at least one proximate luminaire may include comparing an identifier associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective identifiers associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. Generating an illumination command may include generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of the at least one identified proximate luminaire. Identifying at least one proximate luminaire may include identifying a plurality of proximate luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, and receiving illumination data may include receiving illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the plurality of proximate luminaires. Generating an illumination command may include generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires. Generating an illumination command may include generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to operate based at least in part on an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires. The method may further include: receiving, at the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, the illumination command through the data communications channel; and controlling, at the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command. Controlling the illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command may include: controlling at least one light source to be in an illuminating state. Receiving illumination control system fault data may include receiving photosensor data from the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system via the data communications channel. Receiving illumination control system fault data may include: verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values. Verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values may include verifying whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date. Receiving illumination data may include receiving illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule; and storing the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium. Distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel may include distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a wireless communications channel. Distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel may include distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a power-line power distribution system. Distributing the illumination command through a power-line power distribution system may include superimposing the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system. The method may further include: storing a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium. The method may further include: generating, by the at least one central control processor, a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and storing the route map in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium. The method may further include: receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system data that identifies the luminaire previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and causing the luminaire identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources thereof using the operational illumination control system.
An area illumination system may be summarized as including: at least one central control system including at least one central control processor; at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor; at least one central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to: receive, via the at least one central transceiver, illumination control system fault data from one of a plurality of area lighting luminaires of the area illumination system, the illumination control system fault data signifies the illumination control system of the one of the plurality of area lighting luminaires of the area illumination system is a faulty illumination control system; identify at least one proximate luminaire of the plurality of area lighting luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire of the area illumination system identified as having a faulty illumination control system; from time-to-time, receive, via the at least one central transceiver, illumination data from a respective illumination control system of the at least one identified proximate luminaire, the illumination data including at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data; generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and distribute, via the at least one central transceiver, the illumination command to the luminaire of the area illumination system identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel.
The at least one central control processor may: identify a first proximate luminaire and a second proximate luminaire as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and receive illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the first proximate luminaire and the second proximate luminaire. The at least one central control processor may: compare a physical address associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective physical addresses associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. The at least one central control processor may: compare an identifier associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective identifiers associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. The at least one central control processor may: generate an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of the at least one identified proximate luminaire. The at least one central control processor may: identify a plurality of proximate luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and receive illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the plurality of proximate luminaires. The at least one central control processor may: generate an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires. The at least one central control processor may: generate an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to operate based at least in part on an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires. The at least one central control processor may: receive photosensor data from the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system via the data communications channel. The at least one central control processor may: verify whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values. The at least one central control processor may: verify whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date. The at least one central control processor may: receive illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule; and store the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium. The at least one central control processor may: distribute the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a wireless communications channel. The at least one central control processor may: distribute the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a power-line power distribution system. The at least one central control processor may: superimpose the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system. The at least one central control processor may: store a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium. The at least one central control processor may: generate a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and store the route map in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium. The at least one central control processor may: receive illumination control system data that identifies the luminaire previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and cause the luminaire identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources thereof using the operational illumination control system.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
In the drawings, identical reference numbers identify similar elements or acts. The sizes and relative positions of elements in the drawings are not necessarily drawn to scale. For example, the shapes of various elements and angles are not drawn to scale, and some of these elements are arbitrarily enlarged and positioned to improve drawing legibility. Further, the particular shapes of the elements as drawn, are not intended to convey any information regarding the actual shape of the particular elements, and have been solely selected for ease of recognition in the drawings.
FIG. 1 is a schematic view of an environment in which an illumination system may be implemented, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 2 is a functional block diagram of the illumination system of FIG. 1, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 3 is a schematic view of an environment in which an illumination system may be implemented, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 4 is a flow diagram showing a method of operation of a processor-based device to control illumination of a plurality of faulty luminaires in an illumination system, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 5 is a table of information for a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty local illumination control system, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 6A is a map depicting the locations of numerous luminaires identified as having a faulty local illumination control system, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 6B depicts a vehicle service route overlaid on the map depicting the locations of numerous luminaires identified as having a faulty local illumination control system, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 6C depicts three vehicle service routes overlaid on the map depicting the locations of numerous luminaires identified as having a faulty local illumination control system, according to at least one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 7 is a schematic view of an environment in which an illumination system may be implemented, according to one illustrated implementation.
FIG. 8 is a flow diagram of a method of operation of a processor-based device to control illumination of one or more faulty luminaires in an illumination system using illumination data from one or more luminaires proximate the respective one or more faulty luminaires, according to one illustrated implementation.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
In the following description, certain specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of various disclosed implementations. However, one skilled in the relevant art will recognize that implementations may be practiced without one or more of these specific details, or with other methods, components, materials, etc. In other instances, well-known structures associated with the various implementations have not been shown or described in detail to avoid unnecessarily obscuring descriptions of the implementations.
Unless the context requires otherwise, throughout the specification and claims that follow, the word “comprising” is synonymous with “including,” and is inclusive or open-ended (i.e., does not exclude additional, unrecited elements or method acts).
Reference throughout this specification to “one implementation” or “an implementation” means that a particular feature, structure or characteristic described in connection with the implementation is included in at least one implementation. Thus, the appearances of the phrases “in one implementation” or “in an implementation” in various places throughout this specification are not necessarily all referring to the same implementation. Furthermore, the particular features, structures, or characteristics may be combined in any suitable manner in one or more implementations. Additionally, the terms “lighting,” “luminous output” and “illumination” are used herein interchangeably. For instance, the phrases “level of illumination” or “level of light output” have the same meanings. In addition, for instance, the phrases “illumination source” and “light source” have the same meanings.
As used in this specification and the appended claims, the singular forms “a,” “an,” and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly dictates otherwise. It should also be noted that the term “or” is generally employed in its broadest sense, that is, as meaning “and/or” unless the content clearly dictates otherwise.
The headings and Abstract of the Disclosure provided herein are for convenience only and do not interpret the scope or meaning of the implementations.
Systems, methods and articles of the present disclosure are directed to detection and correction of faulty local illumination control systems in outdoor illumination systems. In general, implementations discussed below provide centralized illumination control of area lighting luminaires when locally installed illumination control systems fail, thereby removing or delaying the requirement repair or replace the local illumination control systems.
FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic block diagram of an illumination system 100 that includes a power distribution system 102, such as an alternating current (AC) network of a utility that includes one or more AC power sources 103, a central control system 104, and a plurality of area lighting luminaires 106. Three luminaires 106 are shown in FIG. 1 but it should be appreciated that the number of luminaires may vary depending on a particular application. For example, for applications wherein the luminaires 106 are part of an illumination system for a city, the number of luminaires may be in the hundreds or even thousands. As discussed further below, control output from the central control system 104 is coupled to the power distribution system 102 so as to supply control signals or commands to the plurality of luminaires 106 via power lines of the power distribution system. In some implementations, such as the one illustrated in FIG. 2 and discussed below, the central control system 104 may additionally or alternatively supply control signals or commands to the plurality of luminaires 106 via other types of networks, such as wired and/or wireless communications networks.
Referring to an exemplary luminaire 106 shown in FIG. 1, each luminaire includes one or more light sources 110, a power line transceiver 112 (or wired/wireless transceiver(s), a power supply 114, a local illumination control system (ICS) 115, and a luminaire processor 116.
The local ICS 115 may include a photocontrol that has a photosensitive transducer (photosensor) associated therewith. The ICS 115 may be operative to control operation of the light sources 110 based on ambient light levels detected by the photosensor. The ICS 115 may be coupled to the processor 116 and operative to provide illumination data signals to the processor so that the processor may control the light sources 110 based on the received illumination data signals. The ICS 115 may also be configured as a switch that provides electrical power to the light sources 110 only when detected light levels are below a desired level. For example, the local ICS 115 of the luminaire 106 may include a photosensor that controls an electro-mechanical relay coupled between a source of electrical power and a control device (e.g., a magnetic or electronic transformer) within the luminaire. The electro-mechanical relay may be configured to be in an electrically continuous state unless a signal from the photosensor is present to supply power to the luminaire 106. If the photosensor is illuminated with a sufficient amount of light, the photosensor outputs the signal that causes the electro-mechanical relay to switch to an electrically discontinuous state such that no power is supplied to the luminaire 106.
In some implementations, the ICS 115 may include one or more clocks or timers, and/or one or more look-up tables or other data structures that indicate dawn events and dusk events for one or more geographical locations at various times during a year. The time of occurrence of various solar events may additionally or alternatively be calculated using geolocation, time, or date data either generated by or stored within a nontransitory processor-readable medium of the luminaire 106 or obtained from one or more external devices via one or more wired or wireless communication interfaces either in or communicably coupled to the luminaire. In some implementations, the ICS 115 is implemented partially or fully by the processor 116.
Failure of the ICS 115 used to turn the light sources 110 ON or OFF may result in the light sources remaining in a continuously ON state in the event the automatic control mechanism fails in a “closed” position, permitting current flow to the light sources, or in a continuously OFF state in the event the automatic control mechanism fails in an “open” position, interrupting current flow to the light sources. Either failure mode results in an undesirable mode of operation of the light sources 110.
Due to the relatively short life span of the ICS 115, the ICS may fail when the other components of the luminaire 106 are otherwise fully operational.
The power line transceiver 112 and the power supply 114 of the luminaire 106 may each be electrically coupled with the power distribution system 102. The power line transceiver 112 may transmit and receive power line control or data signals over the power distribution system 102, and the power supply 114 may receive a power signal from the power distribution system. The power line transceiver 112 may separate or decode the power line control or data signals from the power signals and may provide the decoded signals to the luminaire processor 116. In turn, the luminaire processor 116 may generate one or more light source control commands that are supplied to the light sources 110 to control the operation thereof. The power line transceiver 112 may also encode power line control or data signals and transmit the signals to the central control system 104 via the power distribution system 102.
The power supply 114 may receive an AC power signal from the power distribution system 102, generate a DC power output, and supply the generated DC power output to the light sources 110 to power the light sources as controlled by the light source control commands from the luminaire processor 116.
The light sources 110 may include one or more of a variety of conventional light sources, for example incandescent lamps or fluorescent lamps such as high-intensity discharge (HID) lamps (e.g., mercury vapor lamps, high-pressure sodium lamps, metal halide lamps). The light sources 110 may also include one or more solid-state light sources (e.g., light emitting diodes (LEDs), organic LEDs (OLEDs), polymer LEDs (PLEDs)).
The central control system 104 is configured to detect the functional status of the ICS 115 of each of the luminaires 106 in the illumination system 100. Any method of detection the functional status of the ICSs 115 may be used. For example, in some implementations the central control system 104 may interrogate a luminaire 106 (e.g., via the power distribution system 102) during daylight hours and receive signals from the luminaire indicating the luminaire is turned ON, which indicates defective operation. As discussed above, the ICS 115 may be configured to “fail on,” resulting in the luminaire being in the ON state during daylight hours. As another example, the central control system 104 may interrogate a luminaire 106 during nighttime hours and receive signals from the luminaire indicating the luminaire is turned OFF, which indicates defective operation. In some implementations, the luminaire 106 may be configured to automatically send a notification or alert signal (e.g., via the power distribution system 102) when the local ICS 115 is determined to be faulty.
Once a luminaire 106 with a faulty ICS 115 has been detected or otherwise identified, the central control system 104 may store identification information in one or more nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media. The identification information may include various information, such as a logical address, a physical address, GPS coordinates, type or model of local ICS, one or more fault codes, luminaire installation information (e.g., height, accessibility, security restrictions), or other information that may be useful for replacing or repairing a faulty local ICS or for coordinating repair or replacement of a faulty ICS.
The central control system 104 may remotely control the operation of luminaires 106 determined to have a faulty ICS 115. To achieve this functionality, the central control system 104 may be operatively coupled to an illumination data source 108 that provides illumination data to the central control system through a suitable wired and/or wireless interface. In some implementations, the illumination data source 108 may include one or more photosensors operative to sense ambient light which may be used to detect one or more solar events (e.g., dawn event, dusk event). In some implementations, the illumination data source 108 may include one or more clocks or timers, and/or one or more look-up tables or other data structures that indicate dawn events and dusk events for one or more geographical locations at various times during a year. The time of occurrence of various solar events may additionally or alternatively be calculated using geolocation, time, or date data either generated by or stored within the central control system 104 or obtained from one or more external devices via one or more wired or wireless communication interfaces either in or communicably coupled to the central control system.
The central control system 104 receives illumination data from the illumination data source 108. Upon receipt of the illumination data, the central control system 104 may generate an illumination command directed to luminaires 106 identified as having faulty ICSs 115 (e.g., faulty photocontrols).
In some implementations, the illumination command from the central control system 104 may be converted into power line control signals that may be superimposed onto wiring of the power distribution system 102 so that the control signals are transmitted or distributed to the luminaires 106 having faulty ICSs 115 via the power distribution system. In some implementations, the power line control system signals may be in the form of amplitude modulation signals, frequency modulation signals, frequency shift keyed signals (FSK), differential frequency shift keyed signals (DFSK), differential phase shift keyed signals (DPSK), or other types of signals. The command code format of the control signals may be that of a commercially available controller format or may be that of a custom controller format. An example power line communication system is the TWACS® system available from Aclara Corporation, Hazelwood, Mo.
The central control system 104 may utilize a power line transceiver (see FIG. 2) that includes special coupling capacitors to connect transmitters to power-frequency AC conductors of the power distribution system 102. Signals may be impressed on one conductor, on two conductors or on all three conductors of a high-voltage AC transmission line. Filtering devices may be applied at substations of the power distribution system 102 to prevent the carrier frequency current from being bypassed through substation infrastructure. Power line carrier systems may be favored by utilities because they allow utilities to reliably move data over an infrastructure that they control.
In some instances, the power line control signals may be in the form of a broadcast signal or command delivered to each of the luminaires 106 in the illumination system 100. In some instances, the power line control signals may be specifically addressed to an individual luminaire 106, or to one or more groups or subsets of luminaires. For example, in some implementations, the central control system 104 may broadcast an illumination command to all of the luminaires 106 in an illumination system 100, but only luminaires having faulty ICSs 115 execute the illumination command. In some implementations, the central control system 104 may transmit illumination commands that are addressed only to those luminaires 106 identified as having faulty ICSs 115.
The central control system 104 may continue to detect or receive indications of the functional status of the ICS 115 of each of the luminaires 106 in the illumination system 100 while controlling the operation of the luminaires determined to have faulty ICSs. Upon identifying that a faulty ICS has been repaired or replaced with a functional ICS, the central control system 104 may permit the presently functional local ICS to control its respective luminaire. In other words, the central control system 104 may relinquish control of a luminaire once it has been determined that the ICS of the luminaire is once again functional (e.g., after repair or replacement of the ICS or other component).
FIG. 2 and the following discussion provide a brief, general description of the components forming the illustrative illumination system 100 including the central control system 104, the power distribution system 102, the illumination data source 108, and the luminaires 106 in which the various illustrated implementations can be implemented. Although not required, some portion of the implementations will be described in the general context of computer-executable instructions or logic, such as program application modules, objects, or macros being executed by a computer. Those skilled in the relevant art will appreciate that the illustrated implementations as well as other implementations can be practiced with other computer system or processor-based device configurations, including handheld devices, for instance Web enabled cellular phones or PDAs, multiprocessor systems, microprocessor-based or programmable consumer electronics, personal computers (“PCs”), network PCs, minicomputers, mainframe computers, and the like. The implementations can be practiced in distributed computing environments where tasks or modules are performed by remote processing devices, which are linked through a communications network. In a distributed computing environment, program modules may be located in both local and remote memory storage devices.
The central control system 104 may take the form of a PC, server, or other computing system executing logic or other machine executable instructions which may advantageously improve machine-readable symbol reading, allowing blurred and otherwise unreadable machine-readable symbols to be successfully read and decoded. The central control system 104 includes one or more processors 206, a system memory 208 and a system bus 210 that couples various system components including the system memory 208 to the processor 206. The central control system 104 will at times be referred to in the singular herein, but this is not intended to limit the implementations to a single system, since in certain implementations, there will be more than one central control system 104 or other networked computing device involved. Non-limiting examples of commercially available systems include, but are not limited to, an 80x86 or Pentium series microprocessor from Intel Corporation, U.S.A., a PowerPC microprocessor from IBM, a Sparc microprocessor from Sun Microsystems, Inc., a PA-RISC series microprocessor from Hewlett-Packard Company, or a 68xxx series microprocessor from Motorola Corporation.
The central control system 104 may be implemented as a supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system or as one or more components thereof. Generally, a SCADA system is a system operating with coded signals over communication channels to provide control of remote equipment. The supervisory system may be combined with a data acquisition system by adding the use of coded signals over communication channels to acquire information about the status of the remote equipment for display or for recording functions.
The processor 206 may be any logic processing unit, such as one or more central processing units (CPUs), microprocessors, digital signal processors (DSPs), graphics processors (GPUs), application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), etc. Unless described otherwise, the construction and operation of the various blocks shown in FIG. 2 are of conventional design. As a result, such blocks need not be described in further detail herein, as they will be understood by those skilled in the relevant art.
The system bus 210 can employ any known bus structures or architectures. The system memory 208 includes read-only memory (“ROM”) 212 and random access memory (“RAM”) 214. A basic input/output system (“BIOS”) 216, which may be incorporated into at least a portion of the ROM 212, contains basic routines that help transfer information between elements within the central control system 104, such as during start-up. Some implementations may employ separate buses for data, instructions and power.
The central control system 104 also may include one or more drives 218 for reading from and writing to one or more nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media 220 (e.g., hard disk, magnetic disk, optical disk). The drive 218 may communicate with the processor 206 via the system bus 210. The drive 218 may include interfaces or controllers (not shown) coupled between such drives and the system bus 210, as is known by those skilled in the art. The drives 218 and their associated nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media 220 provide nonvolatile storage of computer-readable instructions, data structures, program modules and other data for the central control system 104. Those skilled in the relevant art will appreciate that other types of computer-readable media may be employed to store data accessible by a computer.
Program modules can be stored in the system memory 208, such as an operating system 230, one or more application programs 232, other programs or modules 234, and program data 238.
The application program(s) 232 may include logic capable of providing the luminaire control functionality described herein. For example, applications programs 232 may include programs for controlling luminaires 106 having faulty ICSs 115 (FIG. 1) based at least in part on data received from the illumination data source 108.
The system memory 208 may include communications programs 240 that permit the central control system 104 to access and exchange data with other networked systems or components, such as the luminaires 106 and/or other computing devices.
While shown in FIG. 2 as being stored in the system memory 208, the operating system 230, application programs 232, other programs/modules 234, program data 238 and communications 240 can be stored on the nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media 220 or other nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media.
Personnel can enter commands (e.g., system maintenance, upgrades) and information (e.g., parameters) into the central control system 104 using one or more communicably coupled input devices 246 such as a touch screen or keyboard, a pointing device such as a mouse, and/or a push button. Other input devices can include a microphone, joystick, game pad, tablet, scanner, biometric scanning device, etc. These and other input devices may be connected to the processing unit 206 through an interface such as a universal serial bus (“USB”) interface that couples to the system bus 210, although other interfaces such as a parallel port, a game port or a wireless interface or a serial port may be used. One or more output devices 250, such as a monitor or other display device, may be coupled to the system bus 210 via a video interface, such as a video adapter. In at least some instances, the input devices 246 and the output devices 250 may be located proximate the central control system 104, for example when the system is installed at the system user's premises. In other instances, the input devices 246 and the output devices 250 may be located remote from the central control system 104, for example when the system is installed on the premises of a service provider.
In some implementations, the central control system 104 uses one or more of the logical connections to optionally communicate with one or more luminaires 106, remote computers, servers and/or other devices via one or more communications channels, for example, one or more networks 113. These logical connections may facilitate any known method of permitting computers to communicate, such as through one or more LANs and/or WANs. Such networking environments are known in wired and wireless enterprise-wide computer networks, intranets, extranets, and the Internet.
In some implementations, a network port or interface 256, communicatively linked to the system bus 210, may be used for establishing and maintaining communications over the communications network 113.
The central control system 104 may include a power line transceiver or interface 258 and an AC/DC power supply 260 that are each electrically coupled to the power distribution system 102. The AC/DC power supply 260 converts AC power from the power distribution system 102 into DC power, which may be provided to power the various components of the central control system 104. As discussed above, the power line interface 258 may be operative to superimpose control signals onto one or more conductors of the power distribution system 102 that carries power to the luminaires 106. The power line interface 258 may also be operative to decode and receive communication signals sent over the power distribution system 102 (e.g., from the power line interface 112 of a luminaire 106 (FIG. 1)).
In some implementations, the central control system 104 may utilize one or more wired and/or wireless communications networks 113 to communicate with the luminaires 106 instead of or in addition to communicating through the power distribution system 102.
In the illumination system 100, program modules, application programs, or data, or portions thereof, can be stored in one or more computing systems. Those skilled in the relevant art will recognize that the network connections shown in FIG. 2 are only some examples of ways of establishing communications between computers, and other connections may be used, including wireless. In some implementations, program modules, application programs, or data, or portions thereof, can even be stored in other computer systems or other devices (not shown).
For convenience, the processor 206, system memory 208, network port 256 and devices 246, 250 are illustrated as communicatively coupled to each other via the system bus 210, thereby providing connectivity between the above-described components. In alternative implementations, the above-described components may be communicatively coupled in a different manner than illustrated in FIG. 2. For example, one or more of the above-described components may be directly coupled to other components, or may be coupled to each other, via intermediary components (not shown). In some implementations, system bus 210 is omitted and the components are coupled directly to each other using suitable connections.
It should be appreciated that the luminaires 106 may include components similar to those components present in the central control system 104, including the processor 206, power supply 260, power line interface 258, buses, nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media, wired or wireless communications interfaces, and one or more input and/or output devices.
FIG. 3 shows a schematic block diagram of an illumination system 300. The illumination system 300 includes a plurality of sets of luminaires 106 positioned at various geographical locations. In the illustrated simplified implementation, the illumination system 300 includes a set 302 of luminaires 106A-D positioned along a particular stretch of a highway 304, a set 306 of luminaires 106E-G positioned at a park 308, and a set 310 of luminaires 106H-J positioned on a bridge 312. The luminaires 106A-J may be similar or identical to the luminaires described above and shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.
Each of the luminaires 106 is electrically coupled to a power distribution system 314, such as an AC power network provided by an electric utility. A power line interface 316 is operatively coupled to the power distribution system 314. In this implementation, a central control system 318 is operatively coupled to each of the luminaires 106 through a network 320 operatively coupled to the power line interface 316. The network 320 may include one or more wired or wireless networks such as the Internet, an extranet, an intranet, a LAN and/or a WAN.
The central control system 318 may also be operatively coupled to an illumination data source 322, such as a photosensor, one or more look-up tables, one or more clocks or timers, or other data structures that provide information useful to determining when to turn on and turn off the luminaires 106 having a faulty ICS. In some implementations, the illumination data source 322 may be a plurality of illumination data sources. For example, a photosensor may be positioned at each of the highway 304, the park 308 and the bridge 312. In some implementations, the illumination data source 322 may be associated with one or more of the individual luminaires 106. For example, the illumination system 300 may include one photosensor that is a component of a luminaire 106 at the park 308, one photosensor that is a component of a luminaire on the highway 304, and one photosensor that is a component of a luminaire on the bridge 312. In these instances, the respective luminaires 106 including the photosensors may send illumination data to the central control system 318 via the power distribution system 314 so that the central control system can generate appropriate illumination control commands for the luminaires in the illumination system identified as having faulty local ICSs.
FIG. 4 shows a method 400 of operating one or more processor-based devices to control the illumination of one or more geographical areas.
The method 400 starts at 402. For example, the method 400 may start in response to commissioning an illumination system, such as the illumination systems 100 and 300 shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, respectively.
At 404, the central control system may receive illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more luminaires as a faulty illumination control system. For example, the central control system may interrogate a plurality of luminaires via a power line communication system to determine whether any ICSs are not operating normally. Additionally or alternatively, individual luminaires may send a notification upon making a determination that a local ICS is faulty.
At 406, the central control system may receive illumination data relating to ambient illumination or a time of day from an illumination data source. For example, the central control system may receive illumination data from a photosensor, or from a look-up table of dusk and dawn times.
At 408, the central control system generates an illumination command based on the received illumination data. As discussed above, the illumination command may be directed to all luminaires in the illumination system that have been identified as having faulty local ICSs.
At 410, the central control system causes the illumination command to be distributed to the luminaires having faulty local ICSs through a power distribution system using power line communication. By using power line communication, the illumination system may use existing infrastructure without incurring the expense of adding additional wired or wireless communication channels.
At 412, the luminaires receive the illumination command through the power distribution system. As shown in FIG. 1, each of the luminaires may be equipped with a power line communications transceiver that facilitates reception of the illumination commands from the central control system over the power distribution system.
At 414, the luminaires having faulty ICSs control the illumination of its respective light sources based at least in part on the illumination command received from the central control system. Each of the luminaires may control its respective light sources to be in the on state, off state, or a dimmed state. Further, as discussed above, each luminaire may determine whether the illumination command is directed to the luminaire based on addressing information in the command or other information specifying to which luminaires in the set of luminaires the command is directed. Thus, luminaires having faulty ICSs may continue to operate relatively normally (e.g., on at night, off during the day) using the control commands received from the central control system via the power distribution system until the ICS is repaired or replaced.
The method 400 ends at 416 until started or invoked again. For example, the method 400 may be operated substantially continuously for an extended duration (e.g., years) so that the luminaires having defective ICSs are continuously controlled through day and night for an extended period of time until the ICSs are repaired or replaced. It should be appreciated that one advantage provided by the implementations of the present disclosure is that illumination systems are improved because they may continue to operate automatically even when locally installed illumination control systems are defective.
As discussed above, the central control system may store in a database or other nontransitory processor-readable storage medium information relating to luminaires identified as having faulty illumination control systems (e.g., a defective photocontrol). FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary log or table 500 of luminaires identified as having faulty illumination control systems. The table 500 may be stored in a nontransitory processor-readable data storage communicatively coupled to the central control system. The table 500 may be displayed to a user on an output device (e.g., a monitor, touchscreen) of a computing device operatively coupled to the central control system.
In the illustrated implementation, the table 500 includes various information about each luminaire identified as having a faulty ICS. Specifically, for each luminaire, the table 500 includes: a luminaire identifier 502, a physical address 504 of the luminaire, GPS coordinates 506 of the luminaire, ICS type 508, error codes 510, and accessibility information 512 for the luminaire. These categories are provided as non-limiting examples of luminaire information that may be provided. The physical address 504 may be a postal address or any other address providing location information to the user. The ICS type 508 may include a model description or part number so that the user of the system may know which parts to order for repair or replacement. The error codes 510 may provide the user with information relating to precisely how an ICS system has failed (e.g., an error code indicating a faulty photosensor). Accessibility information 512 may include information helpful for planning repair or replacement of the ICS of the luminaire. For example, accessibility information 512 may include the height of the luminaire so technicians will know what equipment is needed to reach the luminaire to repair or replace the failed ICS.
In some implementations, the central control system is operative to generate a map of luminaires having faulty ICSs so that when it is desired to repair or replace them, the central control system may generate a vehicle service route that minimizes service expense.
FIG. 6A illustrates a map 600 that may be generated by the central control system. The map depicts a service vehicle depot 602 and a plurality of faulty luminaires 604 positioned at various locations throughout a geographical area (e.g., a city). The map 600 may be displayed to a user on an output device (e.g., a monitor, touchscreen) of a computing device operatively coupled to the central control system.
In some implementations, the central control system may generate a vehicle service route that may be used by service technicians when repairing or replacing a plurality of ICSs. FIG. 6B illustrates an example service route 606 generated for traveling from the service vehicle depot 602, to each of the faulty luminaires 604, and returning to the depot.
In some implementations, an entity responsible for maintaining an illumination system, such as a public utility, may have a fleet of service vehicles and technicians. In such cases, the central control system may generate multiple vehicle service routes, one for each vehicle that services the faulty luminaires. In the example shown in FIG. 6C, the central control system has generated three service routes 608A, 608B, and 608C, one service route for each of three service vehicles used to service the faulty luminaires 604. In some implementations, the central control system may generate routes involving multiple service vehicles and/or multiple service vehicle depots.
In some implementations, the central control system may generate a service order and service route only when certain criteria are met. For example, it may not be economically desirable to generate a service order to replace a single ICS or just a few ICSs. The central control system may generate a service order only when a certain number of ICSs are determined to be faulty, or may generate a service order only when an estimated duration for a service trip exceeds a threshold. As an example, the central control system may generate a service order and a corresponding vehicle route map when the central control system determines that a number (e.g., five, eight, twenty) of ICSs are faulty within a geographical area. As another example, the central control system may generate a service order and corresponding route map when the central control system determines that a service trip is expected to require a duration of time equivalent to a shift of a service technician (e.g., eight hours). Thus, the central control system may optimize human and other resources available to minimize the expense of repairing or replacing faulty ICSs.
The central control system may utilize any method to determine service routes. In some implementations, the central control system takes into account traffic information and work shift information. In some implementations, the central control system solves one or more combinatorial optimization problems to determine optimal service routes. In some cases, it may be difficult to determine an optimal solution, so in practice heuristic and deterministic methods may be used to find acceptably good vehicle service routes.
FIG. 7 shows a schematic block diagram of an illumination system 700 which allows area lighting system luminaires which have a faulty ICS to continue to operate relatively normally, even during local ambient light affecting events (e.g., thunderstorms, eclipses, external light sources, temporary light blocking devices such as construction equipment). The illumination system 700 includes a number N of luminaires 7081-N (collectively, “luminaires 708”) positioned at various geographical locations along a stretch of a highway 702 which are operable to provide area lighting or area illumination. The number N may be a value greater than one (e.g., 2, 50, 5000). In other implementations, the illumination system 700 may additionally or alternatively include sets of luminaires 708 positioned at other locations, such as parks, bridges, parking lots, neighborhood streets, etc., to provide area lighting or area illumination for such areas. The luminaires 708 may be similar or identical to the luminaires described above and shown in FIGS. 1 and 2.
Each of the luminaires 708 is electrically coupled to one or more networks 706, which may include a power distribution system, such as an AC power network provided by an electric utility. In such cases, a power line interface may be operatively coupled to the power distribution system (see FIG. 3). In this illustrated implementation, a central control system 704 is operatively coupled to each of the luminaires 708 through the one or more networks 706. In addition to or instead of the power line interface, the one or more networks 706 may include one or more wired and/or wireless networks such as the Internet, an extranet, an intranet, a LAN and/or a WAN.
The central control system 704 detects the functional status of the local illumination control system (ICS) of each of the luminaires 708 in the illumination system 700. Any method of detection the functional status of the ICSs may be used. For example, in some implementations the central control system 704 may interrogate a luminaire 708 via the one or more networks 706 during daylight hours and receive signals from the luminaire indicating the luminaire is turned ON, which indicates defective operation. As discussed above, the ICS of each of the luminaires 708 may be configured to “fail on,” resulting in the luminaire being in the ON state during daylight hours. As another example, the central control system 704 may interrogate a luminaire 708 during nighttime hours and receive signals from the luminaire indicating the luminaire is turned OFF, which indicates defective operation. Notably, area lighting systems during normal operation provide illumination during nighttime hours and cease to provide illumination during daylight hours. In some implementations, each of the luminaires 708 may automatically send a notification or alert signal (e.g., via the one or more networks 706) when its local ICS is determined to be faulty.
Once a luminaire 708 with a faulty ICS has been detected or otherwise identified, the central control system 704 may store identification information in one or more nontransitory computer- or processor-readable media. The identification information may include various information, such as a logical address, a physical address, GPS coordinates, type or model of local ICS, one or more fault codes, luminaire installation information (e.g., height, accessibility, security restrictions), one or more identifiers, or other information that may be useful for replacing or repairing a faulty local ICS or for coordinating repair or replacement of a faulty ICS.
The central control system 704 may remotely control the operation of luminaires 708 determined to have a faulty ICS. To achieve this functionality, the central control system 704 may receive illumination data from one or more luminaires identified as being physically proximate the luminaire with the faulty ICS through the one or more networks 706. Such luminaires may be referred to herein as “proximate luminaires.”
For example, the luminaires 708 along the stretch of highway 702 may be ordered from 1-N, with luminaires having adjacent numbers being physically adjacent each other. In this case, should the ICS of the luminaire 7082 become faulty, the central control system 704 may receive illumination data from one or more of the luminaires proximate the luminaire 7082, such as the luminaires 7081 and/or 7083, since such luminaires are likely to be in similar ambient lighting conditions as the luminaire 7082. Similarly, should the ICS of the luminaire 708102 become faulty, the central control system 704 may receive illumination data from one or more of the luminaires physically proximate the luminaire 708102, such as the luminaires 708101 and/or 708103.
The illumination data received from the one or more luminaires proximate the luminaire having a faulty ICS may include at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data. For example, the illumination data may include ambient illumination data which may be indicative of one or more solar events (e.g., dawn, dusk, day, night). The illumination data may include illumination state data, such as whether one or more light sources of the proximate luminaire is presently in an illuminating state or a non-illuminating state.
Upon receipt of the illumination data from the one or more proximate luminaires, the central control system 704 may generate an illumination command directed to the luminaire 708 identified as having a faulty ICS (e.g., faulty photocontrols). For example, the central control system 704 may generate an illumination command which instructs the luminaire 708 having the faulty ICS to mimic the operation of a proximate luminaire. In instances where the central control system 704 obtains illumination data from a plurality of proximate luminaires, the central control system 704 may generate an illumination command which instructs the luminaire 708 having a faulty ICS to mimic the operation of a majority of the plurality of proximate luminaires. For example, the central control system 704 may receive illumination state information from three proximate luminaires 708 located nearby a luminaire with a faulty ICS. The central control system 704 may control the faulty luminaire to mimic the operation of at least two of the three proximate luminaires such that, if at least two of the three proximate luminaires are in an illuminating state, the faulty luminaire will be controlled to be in an illuminating state. Similarly, if at least two of the three proximate luminaires are in a non-illuminating state, the faulty luminaire will be controlled to be in a non-illuminating state. The central control system 704 may from time-to-time (e.g., every minute, ever five minutes, every 20 minutes) receive the illumination data from the one or more proximate luminaires and update the illumination commands sent to faulty luminaire accordingly.
In some implementations in which the one or more networks 706 includes a power distribution system, the illumination command from the central control system 704 may be converted into power line control signals that may be superimposed onto wiring of the power distribution system so that the control signals are transmitted or distributed to the luminaires 708 having faulty ICSs via the power distribution system. In some implementations, the power line control system signals may be in the form of amplitude modulation signals, frequency modulation signals, frequency shift keyed signals (FSK), differential frequency shift keyed signals (DFSK), differential phase shift keyed signals (DPSK), or other types of signals. The command code format of the control signals may be that of a commercially available controller format or may be that of a custom controller format. An example power line communication system is the TWACS® system available from Aclara Corporation, Hazelwood, Mo.
The central control system 704 may utilize a power line transceiver (see FIG. 2) that includes special coupling capacitors to connect transmitters to power-frequency AC conductors of the power distribution system. Signals may be impressed on one conductor, on two conductors or on all three conductors of a high-voltage AC transmission line. Filtering devices may be applied at substations of the power distribution system to prevent the carrier frequency current from being bypassed through substation infrastructure. Power line carrier systems may be favored by utilities because they allow utilities to reliably move data over an infrastructure that they control.
In some instances, the power line control signals may be in the form of a broadcast signal or command delivered to each of the luminaires 708 in the illumination system 700. In some instances, the power line control signals may be specifically addressed to an individual luminaire 708, or to one or more groups or subsets of luminaires.
The central control system 704 may continue to detect or receive indications of the functional status of the ICS of each of the luminaires 708 in the illumination system 700 while controlling the operation of the luminaires determined to have faulty ICSs. Upon identifying that a faulty ICS has been repaired or replaced with a functional ICS, the central control system 704 may permit the presently functional local ICS to control its respective luminaire. In other words, the central control system 704 may relinquish control of a luminaire once it has been determined that the ICS of the luminaire is once again functional (e.g., after repair or replacement of the ICS or other component).
The illumination system 700 allows luminaires with failed ICSs to be more adaptive to local ambient lighting conditions such as thunderstorms, eclipses, etc. For example, if a storm happens during the day time and the proximate luminaires turn on, the luminaire with the failed ICS may be controlled to also turn on. As the storm passes, the luminaire with the failed ICS may be controlled to turn off due to the proximate luminaires turning off. Such functionality may be advantageous over systems which utilize an ambient light detector physically located remote from a luminaire with a faulty ICS since such systems are not able to account for local ambient events which may be present at the faulty luminaire but not present at the remotely located ambient light detector.
FIG. 8 shows a method 800 of operating one or more processor-based devices to control the illumination of one or more geographical areas. The method 800 may start in response to commissioning an illumination system, such as the illumination system 700 shown in FIG. 7.
At 802, at least one processor of a central control system may receive illumination control system fault data that signifies a locally installed illumination control system of one of the luminaires is a faulty illumination control system. For example, the at least one processor of the central control system may interrogate a plurality of luminaires via a power line communication system to determine whether any ICSs are not operating normally. Additionally or alternatively, individual luminaires may send a notification to the at least one processor of the central control system upon making a determination that a local ICS is faulty.
At 804, the at least one processor of the central control system may identify at least one proximate luminaire of the plurality of luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system. For example, the at least one processor of the central control system may compare a physical address associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective physical addresses associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. As another example, the central control system may compare an identifier (e.g., 1 to N) associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective identifiers (e.g., 1 to N) associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires. As noted above, the central control system may identify a plurality (e.g., 2, 3, 5, 10) of proximate luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system.
At 806, the at least one processor of the central control system may receive illumination data from a respective illumination control system of the at least one identified proximate luminaire. For example, the illumination data may include at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data. The at least one processor of the central control system may receive the illumination data from a photosensor of a functional ICS of a proximate luminaire, for example.
At 808, the at least one processor of the central control system generates an illumination command based on the illumination data received from the one or more proximate luminaires. For example, the at least one processor of the central control system may generate an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of the at least one identified proximate luminaire.
At 810, the central control system causes the illumination command to be distributed to the luminaire having a faulty local ICS through a data communications channel. As noted above, in some implementations, the data communications channel may include a power line communication through a power distribution system. By using power line communication, the illumination system may use existing infrastructure for communication without incurring the expense of adding additional wired or wireless communication channels.
Thus, luminaires having faulty ICSs may continue to operate relatively normally for an area illumination system (e.g., on at night, off during the day) using the control commands received from the central control system which control the faulty luminaire to operate based on the operation of operational luminaires physically proximate the faulty luminaire.
At 812, the at least one processor of the central control system may receive illumination control system data that identifies the luminaire previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system. For example, upon repair or replacement of a faulty ICS of a luminaire, the luminaire may automatically send a notification to the central control system indicating the ICS of the luminaire is presently operating. As another example, upon repair or replacement of a faulty ICS, a technician may manually input a notification to the central control system to inform such that the ICS has been repaired or replaced.
At 814, responsive to receiving the illumination control system data, the at least one processor of the central control system may cause the luminaire identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources thereof using the operational illumination control system.
The method 800 may be operated substantially continuously for an extended duration (e.g., years) so that the luminaires having defective ICSs are continuously controlled through day and night for an extended period of time until the ICSs are repaired or replaced. It should be appreciated that one advantage provided by the implementations of the present disclosure is that illumination systems are improved because they may continue to operate automatically even when locally installed illumination control systems are defective.
The foregoing detailed description has set forth various implementations of the devices and/or processes via the use of block diagrams, schematics, and examples. Insofar as such block diagrams, schematics, and examples contain one or more functions and/or operations, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that each function and/or operation within such block diagrams, flowcharts, or examples can be implemented, individually and/or collectively, by a wide range of hardware, software, firmware, or virtually any combination thereof. In one implementation, the present subject matter may be implemented via Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). However, those skilled in the art will recognize that the implementations disclosed herein, in whole or in part, can be equivalently implemented in standard integrated circuits, as one or more computer programs running on one or more computers (e.g., as one or more programs running on one or more computer systems), as one or more programs running on one or more controllers (e.g., microcontrollers), as one or more programs running on one or more processors (e.g., microprocessors), as firmware, or as virtually any combination thereof, and that designing the circuitry and/or writing the code for the software and/or firmware would be well within the skill of one of ordinary skill in the art in light of this disclosure.
Those of skill in the art will recognize that many of the methods or algorithms set out herein may employ additional acts, may omit some acts, and/or may execute acts in a different order than specified.
In addition, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the mechanisms taught herein are capable of being distributed as a program product in a variety of forms, and that an illustrative implementation applies equally regardless of the particular type of signal bearing media used to actually carry out the distribution. Examples of signal bearing media include, but are not limited to, the following: recordable type media such as floppy disks, hard disk drives, CD ROMs, digital tape, and computer memory.
The various implementations described above can be combined to provide further implementations. To the extent that they are not inconsistent with the specific teachings and definitions herein, all of the U.S. patents, U.S. patent application publications, and U.S. patent applications referred to in this specification and/or listed in the Application Data Sheet, including but not limited to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/052,924, filed May 13, 2008; U.S. Pat. No. 8,926,138, issued Jan. 6, 2015; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/051,619, filed May 8, 2008; U.S. Pat. No. 8,118,456, issued Feb. 21, 2012; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/088,651, filed Aug. 13, 2008; U.S. Pat. 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No. 14/609,168, filed Jan. 29, 2015; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 61/905,699, filed Nov. 18, 2013; U.S. Patent Publication No. 2015/0137693, published May 21, 2015; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/068,517, filed Oct. 24, 2014; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/082,463, filed Nov. 20, 2014; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/057,419, filed Sep. 30, 2014; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/114,826, filed Feb. 11, 2015; U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/137,666, filed Mar. 24, 2015; and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 62/183,505, filed Jun. 23, 2015; are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. Aspects of the implementations can be modified, if necessary, to employ systems, circuits and concepts of the various patents, applications and publications to provide yet further implementations.
These and other changes can be made to the implementations in light of the above-detailed description. In general, in the following claims, the terms used should not be construed to limit the claims to the specific implementations disclosed in the specification and the claims, but should be construed to include all possible implementations along with the full scope of equivalents to which such claims are entitled. Accordingly, the claims are not limited by the disclosure.


1. A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires, each of the area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system, the method comprising:
receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system;
receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day;
generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications network.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving, at the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system, the illumination command through the data communications network; and
controlling, at the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system, illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein controlling the illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command comprises:
controlling at least one light source to be in an illuminating state.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination data comprises receiving photosensor data obtained from a photosensor operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination data comprises receiving time data from a clock operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system comprises receiving photosensor data from at least one of the plurality of luminaires via the data communications network.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more of the locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system comprises:
verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values.
8. The method of claim 7 wherein verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values comprises verifying whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day comprises:
receiving illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule from an external device; and
storing the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium.
10. The method of claim 1 wherein distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a data communications network comprises distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a wireless communications network.
11. The method of claim 1 wherein distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a data communications network comprises distributing the illumination command to the one or more luminaires through a power-line power distribution system.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein distributing the illumination command through a power-line power distribution system comprises superimposing the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system.
13. The method of claim 1 wherein receiving illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day comprises receiving illumination data from an illumination data source positioned remote from at least some of the plurality of luminaires.
14. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
storing a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
15. The method of claim 14, further comprising:
generating, by the at least one central control processor, a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and
storing the route map in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
16. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system data that identifies at least one of the one or more luminaires previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and
causing the at least one of the one or more luminaires identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources of the at least one of the one or more luminaires using the respective operational illumination control systems.
17. An illumination system, comprising:
at least one central control system comprising:
at least one central control processor;
at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor;
a central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and
at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to:
identify at least one luminaire coupled to the power-line distribution system as having a faulty illumination control system;
receive illumination data from the at least one illumination data source relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day;
generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
distribute the illumination command through the data communications network via the central transceiver to the at least one luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system.
18. The illumination system of claim 17, further comprising:
a plurality of area lighting luminaires, each of the area lighting luminaires comprising:
at least one luminaire control processor;
an illumination control system;
at least one light source operatively coupled to the luminaire control processor;
a luminaire transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one luminaire control processor and the data communications network; and
at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one luminaire control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one luminaire control processor, cause the at least one luminaire control processor to:
receive the illumination command through the data communications network via the luminaire transceiver; and
control the operation of the at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command when the illumination control system is identified as being faulty.
19. The illumination system of claim 16 wherein the data communications network comprises a power-line power distribution system, and the luminaire transceiver of each luminaire receives distributed power from the power-line power distribution system and separates the illumination command from the distributed power.
20. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives illumination control system fault data from at least one of the plurality of luminaires via the data communications network.
21. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the at least one central control processor:
verifies whether an illumination control signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications network is within an expected range of values.
22. The illumination system of claim 21 wherein the at least one central control processor:
verifies whether an illumination control signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date.
23. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule from an external device; and
stores the illumination data in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium.
24. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the illumination data source comprises a photosensor operatively coupled to the central control processor, and the at least one central control processor receives photosensor data from the photosensor.
25. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the illumination data source comprises a clock operatively coupled to the central control processor, and the at least one central control processor receives time data from the clock.
26. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the data communications network comprises a power-line power distribution system.
27. The illumination system of claim 26 wherein the at least one central transceiver superimposes the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system.
28. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the illumination data source is positioned remote from at least some of the plurality of luminaires.
29. The illumination system of claim 17 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives illumination control system data that identifies at least one of the one or more luminaires previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and
causes the at least one of the one or more luminaires identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources of the at least one of the one or more luminaires using the respective operational illumination control systems.
30. A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires, each of the plurality of area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system, the method comprising:
receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective luminaires as a faulty illumination control system;
receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day;
generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
causing the illumination command to be distributed through a data communications network;
wherein each of the plurality of luminaires receives the illumination command through the data communications network, and each of the one or more luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system execute the received illumination command.
31. The method of claim 30 wherein causing the illumination command to be distributed through a data communications network comprises causing the illumination command to be distributed through at least one of a wireless communications network or a power-line power distribution system.
32. An illumination system to control the operation of a plurality of area lighting luminaires, the illumination system comprising:
at least one central control system comprising:
at least one central control processor;
at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor;
a central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and
at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to:
receive illumination control system fault data that identifies one or more locally installed illumination control systems associated with one or more respective area lighting luminaires as a faulty illumination control system;
receive illumination data from the at least one illumination data source relating to at least one of ambient illumination or time of day;
generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
cause the illumination command to be distributed through the data communications network via the central transceiver to the plurality of area lighting luminaires, each of the plurality of area lighting luminaires receives the illumination command through the data communications network, and each of the one or more area lighting luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system execute the received illumination command.
33. A method of operation for a processor-based device to control a plurality of remotely located area lighting luminaires of an area lighting system, each of the area lighting luminaires including a locally installed illumination control system, the method comprising:
receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system fault data from one of the luminaires of the area lighting system, the illumination control system fault data signifies the illumination control system of the one of the luminaires is a faulty illumination control system;
identifying, by the at least one central control processor, at least one proximate luminaire of the plurality of luminaires of the area lighting system as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system;
from time-to-time,
receiving, by the at least one central control processor, illumination data from a respective illumination control system of the at least one identified proximate luminaire, the illumination data including at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data;
generating, at the at least one central control processor, an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
distributing the illumination command to the luminaire of the area lighting system identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel.
34. The method of claim 33 wherein identifying at least one proximate luminaire comprises identifying a first proximate luminaire and a second proximate luminaire as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, and receiving illumination data comprises receiving illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the first proximate luminaire and the second proximate luminaire.
35. The method of claim 33 wherein identifying at least one proximate luminaire comprises comparing a physical address associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective physical addresses associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires.
36. The method of claim 33 wherein identifying at least one proximate luminaire comprises comparing an identifier associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective identifiers associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires.
37. The method of claim 33 wherein generating an illumination command comprises generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of the at least one identified proximate luminaire.
38. The method of claim 33 wherein identifying at least one proximate luminaire comprises identifying a plurality of proximate luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, and receiving illumination data comprises receiving illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the plurality of proximate luminaires.
39. The method of claim 38 wherein generating an illumination command comprises generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires.
40. The method of claim 38 wherein generating an illumination command comprises generating an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to operate based at least in part on an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires.
41. The method of claim 33, further comprising:
receiving, at the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, the illumination command through the data communications channel; and
controlling, at the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system, illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command.
42. The method of claim 41 wherein controlling the illumination of at least one light source based at least in part on the received illumination command comprises:
controlling at least one light source to be in an illuminating state.
43. The method of claim 33 wherein receiving illumination control system fault data comprises receiving photosensor data from the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system via the data communications channel.
44. The method of claim 33 wherein receiving illumination control system fault data comprises:
verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values.
45. The method of claim 44 wherein verifying whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values comprises verifying whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date.
46. The method of claim 33 wherein receiving illumination data comprises:
receiving illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule; and
storing the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium.
47. The method of claim 33 wherein distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel comprises distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a wireless communications channel.
48. The method of claim 33 wherein distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel comprises distributing the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a power-line power distribution system.
49. The method of claim 48 wherein distributing the illumination command through a power-line power distribution system comprises superimposing the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system.
50. The method of claim 33, further comprising:
storing a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
51. The method of claim 50, further comprising:
generating, by the at least one central control processor, a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and
storing the route map in at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
52. The method of claim 33, further comprising:
receiving, by at least one central control processor, illumination control system data that identifies the luminaire previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and
causing the luminaire identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources thereof using the operational illumination control system.
53. An area illumination system, comprising:
at least one central control system comprising:
at least one central control processor;
at least one illumination data source operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor;
at least one central transceiver operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and a data communications network; and
at least one nontransitory processor-readable storage medium operatively coupled to the at least one central control processor and storing at least one of data or instructions which, when executed by the at least one central control processor, cause the at least one central control processor to:
receive, via the at least one central transceiver, illumination control system fault data from one of a plurality of area lighting luminaires of the area illumination system, the illumination control system fault data signifies the illumination control system of the one of the plurality of area lighting luminaires of the area illumination system is a faulty illumination control system;
identify at least one proximate luminaire of the plurality of area lighting luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire of the area illumination system identified as having a faulty illumination control system;
from time-to-time,
receive, via the at least one central transceiver, illumination data from a respective illumination control system of the at least one identified proximate luminaire, the illumination data including at least one of ambient illumination data or illumination state data;
generate an illumination command based at least in part on the received illumination data; and
distribute, via the at least one central transceiver, the illumination command to the luminaire of the area illumination system identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a data communications channel.
54. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
identifies a first proximate luminaire and a second proximate luminaire as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and
receives illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the first proximate luminaire and the second proximate luminaire.
55. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
compares a physical address associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective physical addresses associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires.
56. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
comparing an identifier associated with the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to respective identifiers associated with the other luminaires of the plurality of luminaires.
57. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
generates an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of the at least one identified proximate luminaire.
58. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
identifies a plurality of proximate luminaires as being physically proximate the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and
receives illumination data from the respective illumination control systems of the plurality of proximate luminaires.
59. The area illumination system of claim 58 wherein the at least one central control processor:
generates an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to mimic an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires.
60. The area illumination system of claim 58 wherein the at least one central control processor:
generates an illumination command which commands the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system to operate based at least in part on an illumination state of at least one of the plurality of identified proximate luminaires.
61. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives photosensor data from the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system via the data communications channel.
62. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
verifies whether a photosensor signal obtained from a luminaire via the data communications channel is within an expected range of values.
63. The area illumination system of claim 62 wherein the at least one central control processor:
verifies whether a photosensor signal is within a range of values dependent on at least one of a current time and a current date.
64. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives illumination data indicative of an illumination schedule; and
stores the illumination data in a nontransitory processor-readable storage medium.
65. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
distributes the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a wireless communications channel.
66. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
distributes the illumination command to the luminaire identified as having a faulty illumination control system through a power-line power distribution system.
67. The area illumination system of claim 66 wherein the at least one central control processor:
superimposing the illumination command onto a power line of the power-line power distribution system.
68. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
stores a list of a plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
69. The area illumination system of claim 68 wherein the at least one central control processor:
generates a route map that includes as destination points each of the plurality of luminaires identified as having a faulty illumination control system; and
stores the route map in the at least one nontransitory processor-readable medium.
70. The area illumination system of claim 53 wherein the at least one central control processor:
receives illumination control system data that identifies the luminaire previously identified as having a faulty illumination control system as presently having an operational illumination control system; and
causes the luminaire identified as presently having an operational illumination control system to control operation of one or more light sources thereof using the operational illumination control system.

 

 

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