Optical components

The authors of the patent

B29D11/00 - Producing optical elements, e.g. lenses or prisms
G02B5/18 - Diffraction gratings
G02B27/01 - Head-up displays

The owners of the patent US9429692:

Microsoft Technology Licensing LLC

 

A substantially transparent optical component, which comprises polymer, is molded. The optical component has substantially matching grating imprints on respective portions of its surface, which imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. Substantially transparent molten polymer is forced between two surfaces of a molding component. The molten polymer is forced into contact with surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings. An alignment portion is located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces. While the polymer is still liquid, the molding component is reconfigured from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of a fringe pattern formed by the two gratings is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. The new configuration is maintained while the polymer sets.

 

 

BACKGROUND
Optical components can be used in optical systems to alter the state of visible light in a predictable and desired manner, for example in display systems to make a desired image visible to a user. Optical components can interact with light by way of reflection, refractions, diffraction etc. Diffraction occurs when a propagating wave interacts with a structure, such as an obstacle or slit. Diffraction can be described as the interference of waves and is most pronounced when that structure is comparable in size to the wavelength of the wave. Optical diffraction of visible light is due to the wave nature of light and can be described as the interference of light waves. Visible light has wavelengths between approximately 390 and 700 nanometers (nm) and diffraction of visible light is most pronounced when propagating light encounters structures similar scale e.g. of order 100 or 1000 nm in scale.
One example of a diffractive structure is a periodic structure. Periodic structures can cause diffraction of light which is typically most pronounced when the periodic structure has a spatial period of similar size to the wavelength of the light. Types of periodic structures include, for instance, surface modulations on a surface of an optical component, refractive index modulations, holograms etc. When propagating light encounters the periodic structure, diffraction causes the light to be split into multiple beams in different directions. These directions depend on the wavelength of the light thus diffractions gratings cause dispersion of polychromatic (e.g. white) light, whereby the polychromatic light is split into different coloured beams travelling in different directions.
When the period structure is on a surface of an optical component, it is referred to a surface grating. When the periodic structure is due to modulation of the surface itself, it is referred to as a surface relief grating (SRG). An example of a SRG is uniform straight grooves in a surface of an optical component that are separated by uniform straight groove spacing regions. Groove spacing regions are referred to herein as “lines”, “grating lines” and “filling regions”. The nature of the diffraction by a SRG depends both on the wavelength of light incident on the grating and various optical characteristics of the SRG, such as line spacing, groove depth and groove slant angle. SRGs have many useful applications. One example is an SRG light guide application. A light guide (also referred to herein as a “waveguide”) is an optical component used to transport light by way of internal reflection e.g. total internal reflection (TIR) within the light guide. A light guide may be used, for instance, in a light guide-based display system for transporting light of a desired image from a light engine to a human eye to make the image visible to the eye. Incoupling and outcoupling SRGs on surface(s) of the light guide can be used for inputting light to and outputting light from the waveguide respectively.
Surface gratings can be fabricated by way of a suitable microfabrication process to create appropriate surface modulations on a substrate. Microfabrication refers to the fabrication of desired structures of micrometer scales and smaller (such as surface gratings). Microfabrication may involve etching of and/or deposition on a substrate (and possibly etching of and/or deposition on a film deposited on the substrate) to create the desired microstructure on the substrate (or film on the substrate). As used herein, the term “patterning a substrate” or similar encompasses all such etching of/deposition on a substrate or substrate film. Whilst a substrate patterned with a surface grating may be suitable for use as an optical component in an optical system itself, a patterned substrate can also be used as a production masters for manufacturing such optical components. For example, a fused silica substrate (or similar), once patterned with a surface grating, can then be used as part of a moulding component for moulding optical components from polymer e.g. the moulding component may be arranged to provide a moulding cavity with the surface grating on the surface of the cavity. When liquid polymer is forced into the moulding cavity, it is forced into contact with the surface grating so as to imprint the surface grating in the polymer, which then sets to form a solid polymer optical component with the surface grating imprinted on its surface. Thus, large numbers of polymer optical components can be mass-manufactured using the same patterned substrate in an inexpensive, quick and straightforward manner.
SUMMARY
This Summary is provided to introduce a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This Summary is not intended to identify key features or essential features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used to limit the scope of the claimed subject matter. Nor is the claimed subject matter limited to implementations that solve any or all of the disadvantages noted in the Background section.
A first aspect is directed to a moulding process for making a substantially transparent optical component which comprises polymer. The optical component has substantially matching grating imprints on respective portions of its surface. The grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. The process comprises the following steps. Substantially transparent molten polymer is forced between two surfaces of a moulding component. The surfaces have surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings. The molten polymer is forced into contact with the surface modulations so as to imprint the gratings in the polymer. The moulding component is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings. At least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent. The alignment portion is located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable from the alignment portion when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero. The fringe pattern exhibits a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases. Whilst the polymer is still liquid, the moulding component is reconfigured from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. The new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
A second aspect is directed to a moulding apparatus for moulding a substantially transparent optical component which comprises polymer. The optical component has substantially matching grating imprints on opposing portions of its surface. The grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. The apparatus comprises a moulding component, a drive mechanism, a light sensor and a controller. The moulding component has two surfaces, the surfaces having surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings. The moulding component is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings. The drive mechanism is coupled to the moulding component and is controllable to configure the moulding component. At least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent, the alignment portion located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable from the alignment portion when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero. The fringe pattern exhibits a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases. The light sensor is configured to receive at least some of the light which has interacted with both gratings. The controller is configured, whilst the polymer is still liquid, to control the drive mechanism based on sensed data received from the image sensor to reconfigure the moulding component from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle. The new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
Products obtained by any of the processes disclosed herein are also provided. Such products include an optical component for use in an optical system, which optical component is substantially transparent, formed of polymer, and has substantially matching gratings on opposing portions of its surface, the gratings having a relative orientation angle that is zero to within one thousandth of a degree.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF FIGURES
To aid understanding of the subject matter, reference will now be made by way of example only to the following drawings in which:
FIG. 1A is a schematic plan view of an optical component;
FIG. 1B is a schematic illustration of an optical component, shown interacting with incident light and viewed from the side;
FIG. 2A is a schematic illustration of a straight binary grating, shown interacting with incident light and viewed from the side;
FIG. 2B is a schematic illustration of a slanted binary grating, shown interacting with incident light and viewed from the side;
FIG. 2C is a schematic illustration of an overhanging triangular grating, shown interacting with incident light and viewed from the side;
FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an optical component;
FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C are side, plan and perspective views of parts of a moulding apparatus respectively;
FIG. 4D shows various views of a fringe observed at different points in time during a moulding process of one embodiment;
FIG. 5 is a block diagram of a moulding apparatus;
FIGS. 6A and 6B are side views of a moulding apparatus during a moulding process of another embodiment.
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
FIGS. 1A and 1B show from the top and the side respectively a substantially transparent optical component 2, such as a wave guide, having an outer surface S. At least a portion of the surface S exhibits surface modulations that form a surface grating 4, which is a SRG. Such a portion is referred to as a “grating area”. The modulations comprise grating lines which are substantially parallel and elongate (substantially longer than they are wide), and also substantially straight in this example (though they need not be straight in general).
FIG. 1B shows the optical component 2, and in particular the grating 4, interacting with an incoming illuminating light beam I that is inwardly incident on the SRG 4. The light I is white light in this example, and thus has multiple colour components. The light I interacts with the grating 4 which splits the light into several beams directed inwardly into the optical component 2. Some of the light I may also be reflected back from the surface S as a reflected beam R0. A zero-order mode inward beam T0 and any reflection R0 are created in accordance with the normal principles of diffraction as well as other non-zero-order (±n-order) modes (which can be explained as wave interference). FIG. 1B shows first-order inward beams T1, T-1; it will be appreciated that higher-order beams may or may not also be created depending on the configuration of the optical component 2. Because the nature of the diffraction is dependent on wavelength, for higher-order modes, different colour components (i.e. wavelength components) of the incident light I are, when present, split into beams of different colours at different angles of propagation relative to one another as illustrated in FIG. 1B.
FIGS. 2A-2C are close-up schematic cross sectional views of different exemplary SRGs 4a-4c (collectively referenced as 4 herein) that may be formed by modulations of the surface S of the optical component 2 (which is viewed from the side in these figures). Light beams are denoted as arrows whose thicknesses denote approximate relative intensity (with higher intensity beams shown as thicker arrows).
FIG. 2A shows an example of a straight binary SRG 4a. The straight binary grating 4a is formed of a series of grooves 7a in the surface S separated by protruding groove spacing regions 9a which are also referred to herein as “filling regions”, “grating lines” or simply “lines”. The grating 4a has a spatial period of d (referred to as the “grating period”), which is the distance over which the modulations' shape repeats. The grooves 7a have a depth h and have substantially straight walls and substantially flat bases. As such, the filling regions have a height h and a width that is substantially uniform over the height h of the filling regions, labelled “w” in FIG. 2A (with w being some fraction f of the period: w=f*d).
For a straight binary grating, the walls are substantially perpendicular to the surface S. For this reason, the grating 4a causes symmetric diffraction of incident light I that is entering perpendicularly to the surface, in that each +n-order mode beam (e.g. T1) created by the grating 4a has substantially the same intensity as the corresponding −n-order mode beam (e.g. T-1), typically less than about one fifth (0.2) of the intensity of the incident beam I.
FIG. 2B shows an example of a slanted binary grating 4b. The slanted grating 4b is also formed of grooves, labelled 7b, in the surface S having substantially straight walls and substantially flat bases separated by lines 9b of width w. However, in contrast to the straight grating 4a, the walls are slanted by an amount relative to the normal, denoted by the angle α in FIG. 2B. The grooves 7b have a depth h as measured along the normal. Due to the asymmetry introduced by the non-zero slant, ±n-order mode inward beams travelling away from the slant direction have greater intensity that their ∓n-order mode counterparts (e.g. in the example of FIG. 2B, the T1 beam is directed away from the direction of slant and has usually greater intensity than the T-1 beam, though this depends on e.g. the grating period d); by increasing the slant by a sufficient amount, those ∓n counterparts can be substantially eliminated (i.e. to have substantially zero intensity). The intensity of the T0 beam is typically also reduced very much by a slanted binary grating such that, in the example of FIG. 2B, the first-order beam T1 typically has an intensity of at most about four fifths (0.8) the intensity of the incident beam I.
The binary gratings 4a and 4b can be viewed as spatial waveforms embedded in the surface S that have a substantially square wave shape (with period d). In the case of the grating 4b, the shape is a skewed square wave shape skewed by α.
FIG. 2C shows an example of an overhanging triangular grating 4c which is a special case of an overhanging trapezoidal grating. The triangular 4c is formed of grooves 7c in the surface S that are triangular in shape (and which thus have discernible tips) and which have a depth h as measured along the normal. Filling regions 9c take the form of triangular, tooth-like protrusions (teeth), having medians that make an angle α with the normal (α being the slant angle of the grating 4c). The teeth have tips that are separated by d (which is the grating period of the grating 4c), a width that is w at the base of the teeth and which narrows to substantially zero at the tips of the teeth. For the grating of FIG. 4c, w≈d, but generally can be w0 beam and the ∓n-mode beams, leaving only ±n-order mode beams (e.g. only T1). The grooves have walls which are at an angle γ to the median (wall angle). The grating 4c can be viewed as a spatial waveform embedded in S that has a substantially triangular wave shape, which is skewed by a.
The grooves and spacing regions that form the gratings 4a-4c constitute surface modulations.
Other type of grating are also possible, for example other types of trapezoidal grating patterns (which may not narrow in width all the way to zero), sinusoidal grating patterns etc. and have a modulation width that can be readily defined in a suitable manner. Such other patterns also exhibit depth h, linewidth w, slant angle α and wall angles γ which can be defined in a similar manner to FIG. 2A-C.
A grating 4 has a grating vector (generally denoted as d), whose size (magnitude) is the grating period d, and which is in a direction perpendicular to the grating lines which form that grating—see FIG. 1A.
In light guide-based display applications (e.g. where SRGs are used for coupling of light into and out of a light guide of the display system, and/or for providing beam expansion of beams coupled into the waveguide), d is typically between about 250 and 500 nm, and h between about 30 and 400 nm. The slant angle α is typically between about −45 and 45 degrees and is measured in the direction of the grating vector.
FIG. 3A shows a perspective view of an optical component 2 having two separate gratings 4F and 4B on respective portions of the component's surface, which are opposing, substantially parallel and substantially flat. Viewed as in FIG. 3A, these are front and rear portions of the surface. Each of the gratings 4B, 4F is formed of substantially parallel, elongate grating lines and grooved, which are also substantially straight in this example. The gratings 4B, 4F have respective grating periods dF, dB, which may or may not be the same. The gratings 4B, 4F can be of the type described above (and may, but need not be, of the same type).
The gratings 4F and 4B have respective grating vectors dF, dB (front and back grating vectors) which run parallel to their respective grating lines. A plane 3 is shown, which has a normal {circumflex over (n)}(3) (unit vector perpendicular to the plane 3) shown as a dotted arrow. In the example of FIG. 3A, because the front and rear surface portions are substantially parallel, they have substantially the same normals as the plane (≈{circumflex over (n)}(3)) so that the front and rear surface portions and the plane 3 are all substantially parallel (more generally, for non-parallel surface portions, the plane 3 could be defined to have a normal {circumflex over (n)}(3) in the approximate direction of the vector sum of the normals to the front and rear surface portions as this represents a direction of the mean of those normals, which normal {circumflex over (n)}(3) is considered to substantially match those normals when so defined).
Vectors 15F, 15B (shown as dashed arrows) lie in the plane 3, which are geometric projections of the front and back grating vectors dF, dB onto the plane 3. The projections 15F, 15B have an angular separation Δφ, which is an angle in the plane 3 (azimuth), and which is the angular separation of dF, dB when viewed along the normal {circumflex over (n)}(3). The angular separation Δφ is a measure of the relative orientation of the gratings 4F, 4B and is referred to herein as the relative orientation angle of the gratings 4F, 4B. When Δφ=0, the grating lines of the gratings 4F, 4B are aligned, at least when viewed along the normal 3′, and the gratings 4F, 4B are said to be aligned. In the example of FIG. 3, because the front and rear surface portions are substantially parallel, when Δφ=0 the gratings 4F, 4B are aligned when viewed from any viewpoint (more generally, this is true when the gratings 4F, 4B are arranged on opposing surface portions such that their respective grating lines are parallel when Δφ=0).
As will be apparent, the value of Δφ affects the optical characteristics of the optical component 2. In waveguide-based display applications, in which the optical component 2 forms part of a waveguide-based display system, misalignment of the gratings (that is deviation from zero in Δφ) can—depending on the function of the gratings—cause unwanted distortion of the image.
A moulding process for moulding optical components of the type shown in FIG. 3 from polymer will now be described with reference to FIGS. 4A-4D, which show various views of a moulding apparatus 1 during the process. The polymer is substantially transparent, which makes the process suitable for (among other things) moulding waveguides for waveguide-based display systems (see above).
FIG. 4A shows the apparatus 1 from the side. The apparatus comprises blocks 5F, 5B (front, back), 5U, 5D (upper, lower—visible in FIG. 4A only) and 5L (left—visible in FIG. 4B only), which are formed of a rigid material. The reference numeral 5 is used to refer to the blocks collectively. The blocks are arranged in contact so as to form a cavity 11 (moulding cavity), with regions of their surfaces (inner surface regions) forming the surface of the cavity 11. The rigid blocks 5 constitute a moulding component.
Portions of the front and back blocks' inner surface regions are modulated to form respective gratings 4′F, 4′B (front and rear cavity gratings) on each of those inner surface portions, which have structures corresponding to the gratings 4F, 4B of the optical component 2 shown in FIG. 3 respectively—in this case, each cavity grating 4′F, 4′B is formed by surface modulations in the form of substantially parallel, elongate and substantially straight grating lines/grooves, and have periods dF, dB respectively. These inner surface portions constitute opposing portions of the surface of the cavity 11, which are also substantially parallel to one another.
The cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B can be patterned on the front and rear blocks 5F, 5B, for instance, by way of a suitable microfabrication process, or they may themselves be moulded from a suitably patterned substrate.
An injection component 10 forces polymer 8 into the moulding cavity 11 (from the right as viewed in FIG. 4B) when the polymer 8 is in a molten (and thus liquid) state. In this manner, the liquid polymer 8 is forced into contact with the front and rear cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B—that is, into contact with the grooved and lines that form those gratings, which has the effect of imprinting the structure of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B in the polymer 8. The blocks 5 are sufficiently rigid to resist distortion from the force of the liquid polymer, so the gratings are imprinted undistorted. This is ultimately the mechanism by which the gratings 4F, 4B are formed on the optical component 2, itself formed by the polymer 8 upon setting, and for this reason the gratings 4F, 4B of the final optical component 2 are referred to hereinbelow as front and rear “imprint gratings” or equivalently “grating imprints” 4F, 4B. The front and rear surface portions of the final optical component 2 on which the imprint gratings 4F, 4B are formed correspond to the front and rear surface portions of the moulding cavity. The overall size and shape of the final component 2 matches that of the cavity 11 when the polymer was allowed to set therein.
In FIGS. 4A-4D, the z-direction is that of the normal {circumflex over (n)}(3) as defined in relation to the final optical component (which is perpendicular to the cavity surface portions on which the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B are formed in this example), the xy-plane corresponds to the plane 3 of FIG. 3 (which lies parallel to those cavity surface portions in this example), and the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B have a relative orientation angle Δφ′ that is defined in an equivalent manner to that of the imprint gratings 4F, 4B (i.e. as their angular separation measured in the xy-plane).
The arrangement of the rigid blocks 5 is not fixed: at least one of the front and back blocks 5B, 4F (the back block 5B in this example) is susceptible to xy-rotation whilst still maintaining the integrity of the moulding cavity 11 so that it can be rotated whilst continuing to hold the liquid polymer in the cavity 11. Controlled xy-rotation of the back block 5B is effected by controlling a suitable drive mechanism coupled to the back block 5B. Using commercially available drive mechanisms, it is possible to controller xy-rotation of the back block 5B to effect controlled rotation of the back block 5B by miniscule amounts (fractions of a thousandth of a degree, or less) in a regulated manner.
By adjusting the xy-orientation angle of the front and back blocks 5B, 5F relative to one another so as to adjust the relative orientation angle Δφ′ of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B, it is possible to precisely align the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B (that is, to have a substantially zero Δφ′) before the polymer 8 sets. By maintaining a substantially zero Δφ′ whilst the polymer sets, the imprint gratings 4F, 4B on the optical component 2—as formed when the polymer 8 finished setting—are as aligned with equal precision as (i.e. with substantially zero Δφ=Δφ′). The mechanism by which this precise alignment is achieved will now be described with reference to FIGS. 4C and 4D.
FIG. 4C shows a perspective view of components of the moulding apparatus 1. A light sensor 6 (also shown in FIGS. 4A-4B) is positioned forward of the moulding cavity 5 to receive light propagating towards the sensor along a line of sight (LOS—shown as a dotted line) that has passed through a portion 7 of the moulding component 5 (alignment portion), which is a portion of the front block 4′F in this example. The LOS is oriented so as to intersect both of the cavity gratings 4F, 4B. At least the alignment portion 7 of the moulding component is substantially transparent along the LOS, so that light which has interacted with both gratings can propagate out of the moulding component along the LOS.
The disclosure recognizes that, when the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B are in near alignment, an observable fringe pattern is formed that is observable along the LOS. A “fringe pattern” means a pattern created when light interacts with two substantially matching gratings (in this cast, the patterns of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B, which are perceived to overlap when viewed along the LOS) to create a pattern with fringes, the fringe spacing of which depends on the relative orientation angle of the gratings. The fringe pattern is formed of a series of alternating light and dark fringes, whose spacing increases as the relative orientation angle of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B is changed towards zero, at which the fringe spacing become maximal (theoretically infinite were the patterns to be exactly aligned with a relative orientation angle of exactly zero). “Near alignment” means that Δφ′ is within a range near zero that the fringe spacing is detectable (i.e. not so close to zero that the fringe spacing is too large to be detectable, but not so far from zero that the fringe spacing is too small to be detectable).
In practice, the Fringe pattern is best observed using diffracted light from the gratings. The diffracted light will generally propagate along almost the same path as the incident light but in the opposite direction. The path along which incident/diffracted light propagates is labelled I/D in FIG. 4A (R denotes the path followed by light reflected from the back grating 4′B) The LOS is substantially parallel to I/D, thus light visible along the LOS will include light which has interacted with both of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B, including when the polymer 8 is in the cavity 11 (as the polymer 8 is also substantially transparent and thus permits the passage of such light to the sensor 6). Thus, the sensor 6 is able to receive light from inside the moulding cavity which has interacted with both cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B. In the example of FIG. 4A, this light will have been reflected from the back grating 4′B (the reflected light being of a reflective diffraction mode) before passing through the front grating 4′F.
When the relative orientation angle Δφ′≈(5/1000)°, the fringe pattern will typically have a fringe spacing around 2 mm, which is readily observable. As this angle Δφ′ is decreased, the fringe spacing increases to the point at which it becomes substantially maximal—this is the point at the fringe spacing is so large that the pattern is no longer observable because the fringes are larger than the cavity gratings, or at least larger than a portion of the grating being if only that portion is being observed. At this point of substantially maximal fringe spacing, Δφ′ is substantially zero—in practice, when Δφ′ is no more than about (0.5*1/1000)° to (1/1000)°.
This is exploited present moulding process as follows. Whilst the polymer 8 in the moulding cavity 11 is still liquid, the front and back blocks 5B, 5F are brought into near alignment if they are not already in near alignment, so that the fringe pattern is observable along the LOS (current cavity configuration). Their relative orientation angle Δφ′ is then fine-tuned until the fringe spacing becomes substantially maximal, at which point Δφ′ is substantially zero (new and final cavity configuration). That new configuration (with the substantially zero Δφ′) is maintained whilst the polymer 8 sets to form the optical component 2, with the relative orientation angle Δφ of the imprint gratings 4F, 4B being substantially zero (equal to Δφ′ as reached in the new and final configuration) in the final component 2.
FIG. 4D shows views of the alignment portion 7 along the LOS at various points in time during the moulding process. A fringe pattern is visible at these points in time, which exhibits a changing fringe spacing D. The left-most view represents a view at a point in time when the gratings are in near alignment. Moving to the right, views are shown at points in time as the relative orientation angle Δφ′ is changed towards zero (with D increasing accordingly) until reaching the point at which D is substantially maximal as shown in the left-most view (which represents an exemplary view in or near the new and final configuration).
In practice, visibility of the fringe pattern can be increased by suitable illumination of the apparatus. For instance, to enhance the visibility of the fringe pattern, a laser (not shown) may be used to provide a beam that is directed towards the alignment portion 7. The beam is reflectively diffracted back of the back grating 4′B and the diffracted beam then passes thought the front grating 4′F towards the sensor 6. A beam expander (not shown) may be used to expand the beam before reaching the alignment portion 7, so as to increase the area over which the visibility is enhanced. For example, the beam may be expanded to encompass the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B to provide the enhanced visibility of the fringe patterns over the full extent of the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B. Curved components can be made using a curved mould i.e. the surfaces of the moulding component on which the gratings 4′F and 4′B care formed can be curved, whereby the curvature is imparted to the polymer as well as the structure of the gratings 4f, 4′B.
FIG. 5 is a block diagram of the moulding apparatus 1, which comprises a controller 20 connected to control both the drive mechanism 22 and the injection component 10, and to receive sensed data from the sensor 6. The drive mechanism is coupled to at least one of the back blocks 5F, 5B that form part of the moulding component (back block 5B in this example) for fine-tuning the relative orientation angle Δφ′ of the front and back cavity gratings 4′B, 4′B. The controller 20 can adjust Δφ′ automatically by controlling the drive mechanism 22, once it has controlled the injection component 10 force the polymer 8 into the cavity 11.
The controller 20 receives the sensed data from the sensor 6, and adjusts the relative orientation angle Δφ′ of the front and back cavity gratings 4′B, 4′F based on the sensed data until Δφ′ is substantially zero by effecting the procedure outlined above. The controller may be implemented by code executed on a processor.
In a first embodiment, the sensor 6 comprises an image sensing component in the form of a camera, which supplies images of the alignment portion 7, taken along the LOS, to the controller 20 (such images capturing the views shown in FIG. 4D). The controller comprises an image recognition module which performs an automatic image recognition procedure on the received images to detect the fringes of the fringe pattern when captured in the images. The controller adjusts Δφ′ until the results of the image recognition procedure indicate that the fringe spacing D is maximal, and maintains that Δφ′ until the polymer has set.
When illuminated with the laser beam, the fringe pattern is formed by light of the laser beam which has interacted with both gratings. The fringe pattern may not, and need not, be visible on any surface of either mould as the fringe pattern obtained with expanded laser beam can be recorded directly to a pixelated detector (for example, an array of individual pixel detectors), i.e. light reflected back from both alignment gratings interferes and creates the fringe patters on a detection surface of detector. The detector for example may part of the camera. In this manner, the pattern is observed on the surface of a detector instead on the surface of the moulds. The detector is used to detect the fringe spacing as created on the detector, and the moulding process is controlled based on the detected fringe spacing to align the gratings to the maximal fringe spacing.
In a second embodiment, the sensor 6 comprises a photodiode, which is shielded from surrounding light but for a small pinhole—e.g. having a diameter ˜1 mm (order of magnitude)—through which only a small portion of the fringe pattern is observable. That is, such that the only light received by the photodiode is from a small portion of the fringe pattern the size of the pinhole, so that once the cavity gratings are in near alignment, the fringes are larger than the pinhole. The controller 20 then changes Δφ′, e.g. at a uniform rate. As the cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B are brought into alignment, the fringe spacing increases, which effectively results in movement of the fringes (this is evident in FIG. 4D). Thus the intensity of the light received by the photodiode oscillates between high (when only part of a light fringe is observable through the pinhole) and low (when only part of a dark fringe is perceivable through the pinhole) as Δφ′ is changed. As the fringe spacing increases, the rate of this oscillation will decrease due to the light and dark fringes becoming progressively larger so that the rate of oscillation is minimal as Δφ′ becomes substantially zero—in the second embodiment, the controller adjusts Δφ′ until that minimum rate of oscillation is achieved, and maintains that Δφ′ until the polymer has set.
In some optical components, it may be desirable to have additional surface gratings that have a relative orientation angle, which does not deviate from a non-zero amount Φ by more than an amount which is substantially zero (i.e. which is Φ+Δφ, where Δφ is substantially zero). In this case, the gratings 4′F, 4′D as shown in FIG. 4C can be used in the same way as described above, with a first further grating formed on a distinct portion of the front block's inner surface that is oriented at an angle Φ1 relative to 4′F, and a second further grating formed on a distinct portion of the rear block's inner surface that is oriented at an angle Φ2 relative to 4′B. The angles Φ1, Φ2 are such that Φ=|Φ2−Φ1|, which can be achieved to a high level of accuracy using conventional techniques e.g. conventional microfabrication techniques. When the gratings 4′F, 4′B are aligned to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle Δφ′ (relative to one another) using the above techniques, the further gratings will have an orientation angle relative to one another that is substantially Φ i.e. that deviates from Φ by at most an amount of the order of Δφ′ (which is, of course, substantially zero). The further gratings will also be imprinted in the polymer as the polymer is forced into contact with these gratings when liquid in a similar manner to 4′F, 4′B, so that the further gratings as imprinted in the polymer have substantially the desired relative orientation angle Φ.
FIGS. 6A and 6B exemplify an alternative moulding process. In this process a transparent substrate, such as a glass or suitable plastic plate 30. Thin layers of polymer on the substrate are used to replicate the gratings from the mould i.e. the substrate acts as a “back bone” of the optical component and the gratings are formed on thin layers of polymer 8 on the substrate.
FIG. 6A show an alternative moulding apparatus 1′ in an initial arrangement, in which the plate 30, having thin layers of liquid polymer 8 deposited on portions of its outer surface, is disposed between two blocks 5F, 5B. These blocks can be substantially the same as in the apparatus of FIGS. 4A-C, with equivalent gratings 4′F, 4′B. The blocks 5F, 5B are then forced towards one another so that the gratings 4′F, 4′B are forced into contact with the liquid polymer layers as shown in FIG. 6B. In this manner, their structure is imprinted in the polymer layers. The relative orientation angle of the modulations 4′F, 4′B is then changed to substantially zero using the fringe pattern formed by the gratings 4′F, 4′B, and remains thus whilst the polymer layers set. The final optical component comprises the plate 30 and the set polymer layers on the plate's surface.
Note that, in this case, the area in which the polymer is imprinted does not necessarily have to be sealed, and the alignment portion could alternatively be an uncovered gap between the components 5F and 5B (e.g. the sensor 6 could be located below the apparatus 1′ to receive light reflected of both gratings 4′F, 4′B, the alignment portion being the gap between 5F and 5B at the bottom of the apparatus 1′).
As will be apparent, the alternative apparatus 1′ does not need an injection component, but otherwise has a similar configuration to that shown in FIG. 5.
Whilst in the above, the exemplary gratings 4F,4B (equivalently 4′F, 4′B) match due to the fact that they are both formed of substantially straight grating lines, in general gratings which are considered to “substantially match” do not necessarily have to be formed of straight grating lines, nor do they have to be formed of identically shaped curved grating lines. In general, two gratings “substantially match” provided some parts of their respective structures are similar enough for it to be possible to create an observable fringe pattern that exhibits a discernible fringe spacing by overlaying those parts (even though other parts of their structure may be markedly different).
Note that the alignment gratings need not overlap, provided it is possible to receive light which has interacted with (e.g. been reflected from) both at a location in space (e.g. at a detector) so that a fringe pattern is formed at that location.
Whilst in the above, gratings are formed on opposing, substantially parallel surfaces, in general the terminology “opposing surfaces portions” (or similar) encompasses surface portions which are not parallel. Note that the definition of the relative orientation angle (azimuth) between two gratings as set out above with reference to FIG. 3B can be applied to gratings on non-parallel surface portions.
Whilst the above has been described with reference to opposing gratings, the techniques can be applied to non-opposing gratings, whereby the fringe pattern is formed for instance by a beam which has been guided by reflection onto both gratings, and which thus interacts with both.
The cavity gratings 4′F, 4′B (and thus the imprint gratings 4F, 4B) can be binary (slanted/non-slanted), sinusoidal, trapezoidal (e.g. triangular) in shape (among others) and need not have the same shape, slant α, width w, depth h etc. as one another (though this is not excluded).
Whilst the above considers a substantially software-implemented controller 20, the functionality of the controller can be implemented using software, firmware, hardware (e.g., fixed logic circuitry), or a combination of these implementations. The terms “module,” “functionality,” “component” and “logic” as used herein generally represent, where applicable, software, firmware, hardware, or a combination thereof. In the case of a software implementation, the module, functionality, or logic represents program code that performs specified tasks when executed on a processor (e.g. CPU or CPUs). The program code can be stored in one or more computer readable memory devices. The features of the techniques described below are platform-independent, meaning that the techniques may be implemented on a variety of commercial computing platforms having a variety of processors.
For example, the apparatus may also include an entity (e.g. software) that causes hardware of a computer of the apparatus to perform operations, e.g., processors functional blocks, and so on. For example, the computer may include a computer-readable medium that may be configured to maintain instructions that cause the computer, and more particularly the operating system and associated hardware of the computer to perform operations. Thus, the instructions function to configure the operating system and associated hardware to perform the operations and in this way result in transformation of the operating system and associated hardware to perform functions. The instructions may be provided by the computer-readable medium to the computer through a variety of different configurations.
One such configuration of a computer-readable medium is signal bearing medium and thus is configured to transmit the instructions (e.g. as a carrier wave) to the computing device, such as via a network. The computer-readable medium may also be configured as a computer-readable storage medium and thus is not a signal bearing medium. Examples of a computer-readable storage medium include a random-access memory (RAM), read-only memory (ROM), an optical disc, flash memory, hard disk memory, and other memory devices that may us magnetic, optical, and other techniques to store instructions and other data.
Moreover, whilst the above alignment process is automated, manual or partially manual processes are not excluded.
In embodiments of the various aspects set out above, images of the fringe pattern may be captured as the cavity is reconfigured and an automatic image recognition procedure may be performed to detect the fringe pattern in the images, the step of reconfiguring being based on the results of the image recognition procedure.
Light of only a small portion of the fringe pattern may be sensed as the cavity is reconfigured, the step of reconfiguring being based on the rate at which the intensity of that light changes.
Each of the gratings may lie substantially parallel to a plane, and the gratings may not overlap or may only partially overlap with one another when viewed along a direction normal to the plane.
The gratings may be illuminated with an expanded laser beam, the fringe pattern being formed by light of the laser beam which has interacted with both gratings. The light of the laser beam may for instance be received at a detector, part of the received light having been reflected from one of the gratings and another part of the light having been reflected from the other of the gratings, whereby the part and the other part interfere at the detector to form the fringe pattern on a detection surface of the detector. An output of the detector may be used to control the reconfiguring step.
The opposing portions of the cavity's surface may be substantially parallel, so that the opposing portions of the moulded optical component's surface are substantially parallel.
A first and a second further grating may be formed on other opposing portions of the cavity's surface, the first further grating having a first orientation angle Φ1 relative to the one of the gratings and the second further grating having a second orientation angle Φ2 relative to the other of the gratings, so that the first and second further gratings are imprinted in the polymer having a relative orientation angle that is substantially |Φ2−Φ1| in the new configuration.
At least one of the surfaces of the moulding component may be curved so that the polymer sets in a curved configuration.
The moulding component may be arranged to provide a moulding cavity, the surfaces being of the moulding cavity, and the polymer may be forced into the moulding cavity to force the polymer into contact with the surface modulations, the moulding component reconfigured to the new configuration whilst the polymer in the cavity is still liquid.
The polymer may be arranged in layers on the surface of a substantially transparent substrate, whereby the gratings are imprinted in the layers, the moulding component reconfigured to the new configuration whilst the layers are still liquid, the optical component comprising the substrate and the layers once set.
The light sensor may comprise a camera which captures images of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured, the controller may comprise an image recognition module which performs an automatic image recognition procedure to detect the fringe pattern in the images, and the controller may reconfigure the cavity based on the results of the image recognition procedure.
The light sensor may sense light of only a small portion of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured, and the controller may be reconfigured based on the rate at which the intensity of that light changes.
According to a third aspect an optical component for use in an optical system is substantially transparent and has two opposing outer surfaces. At least a respective portion of each of the opposing surfaces is formed of polymer in which a respective grating is imprinted. The gratings substantially match one another and have a relative orientation angle that is zero to within one thousandth of a degree.
The relative orientation angle may for instance be zero to within one half of one thousandth of a degree.
The opposing surface portions may be substantially parallel.
The optical component may be used as a waveguide in a display system to transport light of an image to a user's eye, for example a wearable display system that is wearable by the user.
The gratings may be binary, trapezoidal or sinusoidal in shape.
Another aspect of the subject matter is directed to a moulding apparatus for moulding a substantially transparent optical component which comprises polymer, the optical component having substantially matching grating imprints on opposing portions of its surface, wherein the grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, the apparatus comprising: a moulding component having two surfaces, the surfaces having surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings, wherein the moulding component is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings; a drive mechanism coupled to the moulding component controllable to configure the moulding component; wherein at least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent, the alignment portion located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable from the alignment portion when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero, the fringe pattern exhibiting a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases, the apparatus further comprising: a light sensor configured to receive at least some of the light which has interacted with both gratings; and a controller configured, whilst the polymer is still liquid, to control the drive mechanism based on sensed data received from the image sensor to reconfigure the moulding component from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, wherein the new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
Yet another aspect is directed to a moulding process for moulding a substantially transparent optical component from polymer, the optical component having substantially matching grating imprints on opposing portions of its surface, wherein the grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, the process comprising: forcing substantially transparent molten polymer into a moulding cavity provided by a moulding component, the cavity's surface having surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings on opposing portions of the cavity's surface, the molten polymer forced into contact with the surface modulations so as to imprint the gratings in the polymer, wherein the cavity is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings; wherein at least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent along a line of sight that intersects both gratings so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable along the line of sight when the substantially transparent polymer is in the cavity, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero, the fringe pattern exhibiting a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases, the process further comprising: whilst the polymer in the cavity is still liquid, reconfiguring the cavity from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, wherein the new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
Although the subject matter has been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the subject matter defined in the appended claims is not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described above. Rather, the specific features and acts described above are disclosed as example forms of implementing the claims.


1. A moulding process for making a substantially transparent optical component which comprises polymer, the optical component having substantially matching grating imprints on respective portions of its surface, wherein the grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, the process comprising:
forcing substantially transparent molten polymer between two surfaces of a moulding component, the surfaces having surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings, the molten polymer forced into contact with the surface modulations so as to imprint the gratings in the polymer, wherein the moulding component is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings;
wherein at least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent, the alignment portion located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable from the alignment portion when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero, the fringe pattern exhibiting a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases, the process further comprising:
whilst the polymer is still liquid, reconfiguring the moulding component from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, wherein the new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
2. A moulding process according to claim 1 comprising capturing images of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured and performing an automatic image recognition procedure to detect the fringe pattern in the images, wherein the step of reconfiguring is based on the results of the image recognition procedure.
3. A moulding process according to claim 1 comprising sensing light of only a small portion of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured, wherein the step of reconfiguring is based on the rate at which the intensity of that light changes.
4. A moulding process according to claim 1 wherein each of the gratings lies substantially parallel to a plane, and the gratings do not overlap or only partially overlap with one another when viewed along a direction normal to the plane.
5. A moulding process according to claim 1 comprising illuminating the gratings with an expanded laser beam, the fringe pattern formed by light of the laser beam which has interacted with both gratings.
6. A moulding process according to claim 5 comprising:
receiving the light of the laser beam at a detector, part of the received light having been reflected from one of the gratings and another part of the light having been reflected from the other of the gratings, whereby the part and the other part interfere at the detector to form the fringe pattern on a detection surface of the detector; and
using an output of the detector to control the reconfiguring step.
7. A moulding process according to claim 1 wherein the opposing portions of the cavity's surface are substantially parallel, so that the opposing portions of the moulded optical component's surface are substantially parallel.
8. A moulding process according to claim 1, wherein a first and a second further grating are formed on other opposing portions of the cavity's surface, the first further grating having a first orientation angle Φ1 relative to the one of the gratings and the second further grating having a second orientation angle Φ2 relative to the other of the gratings, so that the first and second further gratings are imprinted in the polymer having a relative orientation angle that is substantially |Φ2−Φ1| in the new configuration.
9. A moulding process according to claim 1 wherein at least one of the surfaces of the moulding component is curved so that the polymer sets in a curved configuration.
10. A moulding process according to claim 1 wherein the moulding component is arranged to provide a moulding cavity, the surfaces being of the moulding cavity, and wherein the polymer is forced into the moulding cavity to force the polymer into contact with the surface modulations, the moulding component reconfigured to the new configuration whilst the polymer in the cavity is still liquid.
11. A moulding process according to claim 1 wherein the polymer is arranged in layers on the surface of a substantially transparent substrate, whereby the gratings are imprinted in the layers, the moulding component reconfigured to the new configuration whilst the layers are still liquid, wherein the optical component comprises the substrate and the layers once set.
12. A product obtained by the process of claim 1.
13. A moulding apparatus for moulding a substantially transparent optical component which comprises polymer, the optical component having substantially matching grating imprints on opposing portions of its surface, wherein the grating imprints have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, the apparatus comprising:
a moulding component having two surfaces, the surfaces having surface modulations which form two substantially matching gratings, wherein the moulding component is configurable to change the relative orientation angle of the gratings;
a drive mechanism coupled to the moulding component controllable to configure the moulding component;
wherein at least an alignment portion of the moulding component is substantially transparent, the alignment portion located so that light which has interacted with both gratings is observable from the alignment portion when the substantially transparent polymer is between the surfaces, whereby an observable fringe pattern is formed as the relative orientation angle of the gratings is changed towards zero, the fringe pattern exhibiting a fringe spacing which increases as the relative orientation angle decreases, the apparatus further comprising:
a light sensor configured to receive at least some of the light which has interacted with both gratings; and
a controller configured, whilst the polymer is still liquid, to control the drive mechanism based on sensed data received from the image sensor to reconfigure the moulding component from a current configuration to a new configuration in which the fringe spacing of the fringe pattern is substantially maximal, thus aligning the gratings to have a substantially zero relative orientation angle, wherein the new configuration is maintained whilst the polymer sets.
14. A moulding apparatus according to claim 13 wherein the light sensor comprises a camera which captures images of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured, and wherein the controller comprises an image recognition module which performs an automatic image recognition procedure to detect the fringe pattern in the images, wherein the controller reconfigures the cavity based on the results of the image recognition procedure.
15. A moulding apparatus according to claim 13 wherein the light sensor senses light of only a small portion of the fringe pattern as the cavity is reconfigured, and the controller is reconfigured based on the rate at which the intensity of that light changes.
16. An optical component for use in an optical system, wherein the optical component is substantially transparent and has two opposing outer surfaces, wherein at least a respective portion of each of the opposing surfaces is formed of polymer in which a respective grating is imprinted, wherein the gratings substantially match one another and have a relative orientation angle that is zero to within one thousandth of a degree.
17. An optical component according to claim 16, wherein the relative orientation angle is zero to within one half of one thousandth of a degree.
18. An optical component according to claim 16, wherein the opposing surface portions are substantially parallel.
19. An optical component according to claim 16, when used as a waveguide in a display system to transport light of an image to a user's eye.
20. An optical component according to claim 16, when used in a wearable display system that is wearable by the user.

 

 

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